A breakthrough in probiotics

Clostridium butyricum regulates gut homeostasis and anti-inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease

Takanori Kanai, Yohei Mikami, Atsushi Hayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by gut microbiota, including beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms. Imbalance in gut bacterial constituents provokes host proinflammatory responses causing diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The development of next-generation sequencing technology allows the identification of microbiota alterations in IBD. Several studies have shown reduced diversity in the gut microbiota of patients with IBD. Advances in gnotobiotic technology have made possible analysis of the role of specific bacterial strains in immune cells in the intestine. Using these techniques, we have shown that Clostridium butyricum as a probiotic induces interleukin-10-producing macrophages in inflamed mucosa via the Toll-like receptor 2/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 pathway to prevent acute experimental colitis. In this review, we focus on the new approaches for the role of specific bacterial strains in immunological responses, as well as the potential of bacterial therapy for IBD treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)928-939
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology
Volume50
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 May 5

Fingerprint

Clostridium butyricum
Probiotics
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Homeostasis
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Germ-Free Life
Technology
Toll-Like Receptor 2
Microbiota
Colitis
Interleukin-10
Intestines
Mucous Membrane
Macrophages
Therapeutics
Genes

Keywords

  • Clostridium butyricum
  • Interleukin-10
  • Macrophages
  • Probiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A breakthrough in probiotics : Clostridium butyricum regulates gut homeostasis and anti-inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease. / Kanai, Takanori; Mikami, Yohei; Hayashi, Atsushi.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 50, No. 9, 05.05.2015, p. 928-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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