A case report of reversible generalized seizures in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome associated with a novel nonsense mutation in the penultimate exon of SOX10

Noriomi Suzuki, Hideki Mutai, Fuyuki Miya, Tatsuhiko Tsunoda, Hiroshi Terashima, Noriko Morimoto, Tatsuo Matsunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) can be distinguished from Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) by the presence of dystopia canthorum. About 96% of WS1 are due to PAX3 mutations, and SOX10 mutations have been reported in 15% of WS2. Case presentation: This report describes a patient with WS1 who harbored a novel SOX10 nonsense mutation (c.652G>T, p.G218*) in exon 3 which is the penultimate exon. The patient had mild prodromal neurological symptoms that were followed by severe attacks of generalized seizures associated with delayed myelination of the brain. The immature myelination recovered later and the neurological symptoms could be improved. This is the first truncating mutation in exon 3 of SOX10 that is associated with neurological symptoms in Waardenburg syndrome. Previous studies reported that the neurological symptoms that associate with WS are congenital and irreversible. These findings suggest that the reversible neurological phenotype may be associated with the nonsense mutation in exon 3 of SOX10. Conclusions: When patients of WS show mild prodromal neurological symptoms, the clinician should be aware of the possibility that severe attacks of generalized seizures may follow, which may be associated with the truncating mutation in exon 3 of SOX10.

Original languageEnglish
Article number171
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 23
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Delayed myelination
  • Nonsense mutation
  • SOX10
  • Seizure attack
  • Waardenburg syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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