A cross-sectional study of alcohol drinking and health-related quality of life among male workers in Japan

Isao Saito, Tomonori Okamura, Shunichi Fukuhara, Taichiro Tanaka, Yoshimi Suzukamo, Akira Okayama, Hirotsugu Ueshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although light and moderate alcohol drinkers are likely to have better subjective health, the sub-scales for subjective health have not been well documented. Methods: We studied 4,521 male workers aged 25 yr and older with no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease, in 12 occupational groups in Japan. Data were from the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion Study (HIPOP-OHP). Drinking status was classified according to daily alcohol intake or frequency of drinking. We assessed the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) based on scores for five scales of the SF-36. Results: Decreased odds ratios of sub-optimal HRQOL conditions, defined as less than the median SF-36 scores, for Role-Physical and General Health were found among persons who consumed 1.0 to 22.9 g/d of alcohol. Odds ratios for sub-optimal Vitality conditions were lowered according to increased levels of alcohol intake. Role-Emotional scores were not associated with alcohol drinking. People who drank 5 to 6 d/wk had higher levels of Role-Physical and Vitality, and those who drank 1 to 2 d/wk had better Vitality and Mental Health scores than non-drinkers. When adjusted for age, marital status, working hours, physical activity at work, self-reported job stress, smoking, regular exercise, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, the associations were almost unchanged except for General Health. Conclusions: Associations of drinking patterns with subjective health varied in five sub-scales of the SF-36. Overall, alcohol drinkers rated their health as good in comparison with non-drinkers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)496-503
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
Japan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Alcohols
Quality of Life
Health
Drinking
Odds Ratio
Exercise
Occupational Groups
Marital Status
Occupational Health
Hyperlipidemias
Health Promotion
Mental Health
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Hypertension
Light

Keywords

  • Alcohol drinking
  • Epidemiology
  • Health-related quality of life
  • SF-36
  • Subjective health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

A cross-sectional study of alcohol drinking and health-related quality of life among male workers in Japan. / Saito, Isao; Okamura, Tomonori; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Tanaka, Taichiro; Suzukamo, Yoshimi; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu.

In: Journal of Occupational Health, Vol. 47, No. 6, 11.2005, p. 496-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saito, Isao ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Fukuhara, Shunichi ; Tanaka, Taichiro ; Suzukamo, Yoshimi ; Okayama, Akira ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu. / A cross-sectional study of alcohol drinking and health-related quality of life among male workers in Japan. In: Journal of Occupational Health. 2005 ; Vol. 47, No. 6. pp. 496-503.
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