A Cycle-to-Cycle Variation Extraction Method for Flow Field Analysis in SI IC Engines Based on Turbulence Scales

Masayoshi Matsuda, Takeshi Yokomori, Yuki Minamoto, Masayasu Shimura, Mamoru Tanahashi, Norimasa Iida

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

To adhere to stringent environmental regulations, SI (spark ignition) engines are required to achieve higher thermal efficiency. In recent years, EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) systems and lean-burn operation has been recognized as key technologies. Under such operating conditions, reducing CCV (cycle-to-cycle variation) in combustion is critical to the enhancement of overall engine performance. Flow-field CCV is one of the considerable factors affecting combustion in engines. Conventionally, in research on flow fields in SI engines, the ensemble average is used to separate the measured velocity field into a mean component and a fluctuation component, the latter of which contains a CCV component and a turbulent component. To extract the CCV of the flow field, previous studies employed spatial filter, temporal filter, and POD (proper orthogonal decomposition) methods. Those studies used a constant- separation filter size for the whole crank angle, although the turbulence scales change rapidly during the intake and compression stroke processes. Hence the definition of filter size has some room to be explored in order to take account of these features. The objective of this research is to improve the method of separating the CCV component using turbulence scales. For this purpose, high-speed PIV measurement was conducted on the symmetrical vertical plane for an optical IC engine at repetition rates of 12 kHz (1 C.A. deg. resolution) for the whole in-cylinder area and 48 kHz (0.25 C.A. deg. resolution) for the plug position. The measured data were separated into CCV and turbulent components by using the proposed filter, whose size was selected adaptively considering the integral time scale of the turbulent flow. The effect of time resolution on the filter size was then elucidated.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSAE Technical Papers
Volume2019-January
Issue numberJanuary
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 15
EventSAE 2019 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2019 - San Antonio, United States
Duration: 2019 Jan 222019 Jan 24

Fingerprint

Electric sparks
Ignition
Flow fields
Turbulence
Engines
Internal combustion engines
Exhaust gas recirculation
Environmental regulations
Engine cylinders
Turbulent flow
Decomposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

A Cycle-to-Cycle Variation Extraction Method for Flow Field Analysis in SI IC Engines Based on Turbulence Scales. / Matsuda, Masayoshi; Yokomori, Takeshi; Minamoto, Yuki; Shimura, Masayasu; Tanahashi, Mamoru; Iida, Norimasa.

In: SAE Technical Papers, Vol. 2019-January, No. January, 15.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Matsuda, Masayoshi ; Yokomori, Takeshi ; Minamoto, Yuki ; Shimura, Masayasu ; Tanahashi, Mamoru ; Iida, Norimasa. / A Cycle-to-Cycle Variation Extraction Method for Flow Field Analysis in SI IC Engines Based on Turbulence Scales. In: SAE Technical Papers. 2019 ; Vol. 2019-January, No. January.
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