A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office

Tomomi Tawada, Toshiharu Ikaga, Shuzo Murakami, Ken Ichi Kameda, Haruka Ueda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Various researches highlight that indoor air quality affects performance of workers in offices1). Although good indoor air quality improves work performance, it also increases energy consumption. In this study, we achieved a field survey in a real office in order to investigate the relationship between thermal environment, productivity, and energy consumption. In addition to the monitoring of indoor environmental quality and energy consumption, subjective experiments were conducted. In order to evaluate subjective performance, workers and students responded to questionnaires, and to evaluate objective performance, students simulated three types of office works. By calculating room temperature and worker's subjective performance, we demonstrate the correlation between room temperature and worker's performance (R=0.45, p<0.01). Results show that the room temperature that maximizes worker's performance was 25.6°C. It was also estimated that the equivalent 'quantity of work' of 8-hour work per day at 25.6°C can be achieved with minimum energy consumption in an environment where the room temperature is 27.3°C.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009 - Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: 2009 Sep 132009 Sep 17

Other

Other9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period09/9/1309/9/17

Fingerprint

Energy utilization
Productivity
Air quality
Students
Temperature
Hot Temperature
Monitoring
Experiments

Keywords

  • Field survey
  • Indoor air quality
  • Subjective experiment
  • Work performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Tawada, T., Ikaga, T., Murakami, S., Kameda, K. I., & Ueda, H. (2009). A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office. In 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009

A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office. / Tawada, Tomomi; Ikaga, Toshiharu; Murakami, Shuzo; Kameda, Ken Ichi; Ueda, Haruka.

9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tawada, T, Ikaga, T, Murakami, S, Kameda, KI & Ueda, H 2009, A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office. in 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009, Syracuse, NY, United States, 09/9/13.
Tawada T, Ikaga T, Murakami S, Kameda KI, Ueda H. A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office. In 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009
Tawada, Tomomi ; Ikaga, Toshiharu ; Murakami, Shuzo ; Kameda, Ken Ichi ; Ueda, Haruka. / A field study of relationship between thermal environment, productivity and energy consumption in an office. 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009. 2009.
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