A fourth mandible and associated dental remains of Gigantopithecus blacki from the Early Pleistocene Yanliang Cave, Fusui, Guangxi, South China

Yingqi Zhang, Changzhu Jin, Reiko Kono, Terry Harrison, Wei Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dentognathic remains of Gigantopithecus blacki from the newly discovered Early Pleistocene locality of Yanliang Cave, Guangxi, South China are described. These include an incomplete mandible, only the fourth discovered and the first known from a site other than Liucheng, as well as 25 isolated teeth. Comparisons of the Yanliang mandible show that the best preserved part of the right corpus is morphologically similar to the left side of the Liucheng Mandible III. In addition, the Yanliang mandible and the Liucheng Mandible III share a similar degree and pattern of wear on the premolars and molars. The partially resorbed alveolus for the right M2 in the Yanliang mandible indicates antemortem tooth loss, which is the first record of its kind for Gigantopithecus blacki. Comparisons of the enamel–dentine junction morphology show that the isolated upper premolars from Yanliang are similar to those of Gigantopithecus blacki from Early Pleistocene sites, and differ from the more specialised form from the Middle Pleistocene Hejiang Cave. This supports the biochronological evidence that Yanliang Cave is Early Pleistocene in age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-104
Number of pages10
JournalHistorical Biology
Volume28
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 17
Externally publishedYes

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Mandible
caves
China
Tooth
teeth
Bicuspid
Tooth Loss

Keywords

  • antemortem tooth loss
  • enamel–dentine junction
  • Gigantopithecus blacki
  • hominoid
  • Pleistocene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

A fourth mandible and associated dental remains of Gigantopithecus blacki from the Early Pleistocene Yanliang Cave, Fusui, Guangxi, South China. / Zhang, Yingqi; Jin, Changzhu; Kono, Reiko; Harrison, Terry; Wang, Wei.

In: Historical Biology, Vol. 28, No. 1-2, 17.02.2016, p. 95-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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