A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach for synthesis of manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies

Manabu Oba, Yuya Oaki, Hiroaki Imai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH)2) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH)2 leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide (β-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na 0.55Mn2O4·1.5H2O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant β-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. An intermediate-mediated approach is used to synthesize manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies. The new synthetic route is inspired by microbial mineralization of manganese oxide in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which inclue antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of the oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4279-4286
Number of pages8
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume20
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 21

Fingerprint

Manganese oxide
manganese oxides
Nanostructures
routes
Oxidation
Manganese
oxidation
synthesis
Chelating Agents
Chelation
Molecules
manganese
aqueous solutions
molecules
manganese ions
ascorbic acid
Ascorbic acid
biomimetics
Biomimetics
room temperature

Keywords

  • batteries
  • biomimetic processes
  • biomineralization
  • manganese oxides
  • nanostructures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

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abstract = "Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH)2) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH)2 leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide (β-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na 0.55Mn2O4·1.5H2O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant β-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. An intermediate-mediated approach is used to synthesize manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies. The new synthetic route is inspired by microbial mineralization of manganese oxide in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which inclue antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of the oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature.",
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N2 - Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH)2) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH)2 leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide (β-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na 0.55Mn2O4·1.5H2O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant β-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. An intermediate-mediated approach is used to synthesize manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies. The new synthetic route is inspired by microbial mineralization of manganese oxide in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which inclue antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of the oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature.

AB - Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH)2) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH)2 leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide (β-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na 0.55Mn2O4·1.5H2O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant β-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. An intermediate-mediated approach is used to synthesize manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies. The new synthetic route is inspired by microbial mineralization of manganese oxide in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which inclue antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of the oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature.

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