A microscopic study on local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foam with microballoons

Enyang Wang, Masaki Omiya

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foams with polymer microballoons in the relative density from 0.5 to 0.8 is studied at the nominal strain rate ranged from 10-1 to 102 s -1. Johnson-Cook law is employed to show the viscoelastic properties of polymer syntactic foams. A microscopic investigation reveals that the strain rate sensitivity and the effect of localised deformations can be observed at the higher strain rate (50-100 s-1). The local deformation mechanism is different in different strain rate regimes due to the effect of local strain rate. At strain rates below 10 s-1, cell-face stretching is the dominant deformation mechanism. At strain rates from 50 s-1 to 100 s-1, cell-face stretching and cell-edge bending are the main deformation mechanism.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvanced Materials Research
Pages1280-1284
Number of pages5
Volume160-162
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event2011 International Conference on Materials Science and Engineering Applications, ICMSEA 2011 - Xi'an, China
Duration: 2011 Jan 152011 Jan 16

Publication series

NameAdvanced Materials Research
Volume160-162
ISSN (Print)10226680

Other

Other2011 International Conference on Materials Science and Engineering Applications, ICMSEA 2011
CountryChina
CityXi'an
Period11/1/1511/1/16

Fingerprint

Syntactics
Foams
Strain rate
Polypropylenes
Stretching
Polymers

Keywords

  • Cellular microstructure
  • Closed-cell
  • Density
  • Polymer
  • Relative elastic modulus
  • Relative yield stress
  • Strain rate
  • Syntactic foam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wang, E., & Omiya, M. (2011). A microscopic study on local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foam with microballoons. In Advanced Materials Research (Vol. 160-162, pp. 1280-1284). (Advanced Materials Research; Vol. 160-162). https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.160-162.1280

A microscopic study on local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foam with microballoons. / Wang, Enyang; Omiya, Masaki.

Advanced Materials Research. Vol. 160-162 2011. p. 1280-1284 (Advanced Materials Research; Vol. 160-162).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wang, E & Omiya, M 2011, A microscopic study on local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foam with microballoons. in Advanced Materials Research. vol. 160-162, Advanced Materials Research, vol. 160-162, pp. 1280-1284, 2011 International Conference on Materials Science and Engineering Applications, ICMSEA 2011, Xi'an, China, 11/1/15. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.160-162.1280
Wang, Enyang ; Omiya, Masaki. / A microscopic study on local strain rate sensitivity of polypropylene syntactic foam with microballoons. Advanced Materials Research. Vol. 160-162 2011. pp. 1280-1284 (Advanced Materials Research).
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