A rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap supplied by perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue for skull, scalp and chest wall reconstructions

T. Minabe, H. Nakajima, Nobuaki Imanishi, H. Ogata, Y. Inoue, M. So, T. Fujino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors describe a new rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap that contains no intercostal vessels that they have developed for use in skull and scalp reconstructions, as well as for reconstructions of the chest wall. To nourish this flap, the blood supply to the ribs does not depend on a direct nutrient artery from the posterior intercostal artery but on the perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. The 8th to the 11th posterior intercostal arteries send off identical perforators to the latissimus dorsi, which are continuous to the periosteal vascular network of the ribs. Further, these perforators, with lengths that range from 4 to 8 cm, are able to provide the torsion required during surgery. The loose connective tissue about these perforators also reinforces the connection of vascularity between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. Thus, elevation of a rib-latissimus dorsi composite flap is possible without any intercostal neurovascular bundles, as is required for conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps. Clinically, the rib blood flow was confirmed by bleeding from the cut edge and a postoperative bone scintiscan. Unlike conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps, this flap has the following advantages: 1 the choice of ribs that can be attached to the flap is extended; 2 a firmer, more mobile connection of ribs and muscle is achieved; 3 the need of a donor site thoracotomy is lessened; and, 4 postoperative pain due to intercostal nerve damage is reduced. Given these features, this flap provides a useful alternative osteomusculocutaneous flap option.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)667-674
Number of pages8
JournalJapanese Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume39
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Perforator Flap
Superficial Back Muscles
Thoracic Wall
Ribs
Scalp
Skull
Connective Tissue
Arteries
Periosteum
Intercostal Nerves
Thoracotomy
Postoperative Pain
Blood Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "A rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap supplied by perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue for skull, scalp and chest wall reconstructions",
abstract = "The authors describe a new rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap that contains no intercostal vessels that they have developed for use in skull and scalp reconstructions, as well as for reconstructions of the chest wall. To nourish this flap, the blood supply to the ribs does not depend on a direct nutrient artery from the posterior intercostal artery but on the perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. The 8th to the 11th posterior intercostal arteries send off identical perforators to the latissimus dorsi, which are continuous to the periosteal vascular network of the ribs. Further, these perforators, with lengths that range from 4 to 8 cm, are able to provide the torsion required during surgery. The loose connective tissue about these perforators also reinforces the connection of vascularity between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. Thus, elevation of a rib-latissimus dorsi composite flap is possible without any intercostal neurovascular bundles, as is required for conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps. Clinically, the rib blood flow was confirmed by bleeding from the cut edge and a postoperative bone scintiscan. Unlike conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps, this flap has the following advantages: 1 the choice of ribs that can be attached to the flap is extended; 2 a firmer, more mobile connection of ribs and muscle is achieved; 3 the need of a donor site thoracotomy is lessened; and, 4 postoperative pain due to intercostal nerve damage is reduced. Given these features, this flap provides a useful alternative osteomusculocutaneous flap option.",
author = "T. Minabe and H. Nakajima and Nobuaki Imanishi and H. Ogata and Y. Inoue and M. So and T. Fujino",
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T1 - A rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap supplied by perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue for skull, scalp and chest wall reconstructions

AU - Minabe, T.

AU - Nakajima, H.

AU - Imanishi, Nobuaki

AU - Ogata, H.

AU - Inoue, Y.

AU - So, M.

AU - Fujino, T.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - The authors describe a new rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap that contains no intercostal vessels that they have developed for use in skull and scalp reconstructions, as well as for reconstructions of the chest wall. To nourish this flap, the blood supply to the ribs does not depend on a direct nutrient artery from the posterior intercostal artery but on the perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. The 8th to the 11th posterior intercostal arteries send off identical perforators to the latissimus dorsi, which are continuous to the periosteal vascular network of the ribs. Further, these perforators, with lengths that range from 4 to 8 cm, are able to provide the torsion required during surgery. The loose connective tissue about these perforators also reinforces the connection of vascularity between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. Thus, elevation of a rib-latissimus dorsi composite flap is possible without any intercostal neurovascular bundles, as is required for conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps. Clinically, the rib blood flow was confirmed by bleeding from the cut edge and a postoperative bone scintiscan. Unlike conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps, this flap has the following advantages: 1 the choice of ribs that can be attached to the flap is extended; 2 a firmer, more mobile connection of ribs and muscle is achieved; 3 the need of a donor site thoracotomy is lessened; and, 4 postoperative pain due to intercostal nerve damage is reduced. Given these features, this flap provides a useful alternative osteomusculocutaneous flap option.

AB - The authors describe a new rib-latissimus dorsi osteomusculocutaneous flap that contains no intercostal vessels that they have developed for use in skull and scalp reconstructions, as well as for reconstructions of the chest wall. To nourish this flap, the blood supply to the ribs does not depend on a direct nutrient artery from the posterior intercostal artery but on the perforators of the posterior intercostal arteries and loose connective tissue between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. The 8th to the 11th posterior intercostal arteries send off identical perforators to the latissimus dorsi, which are continuous to the periosteal vascular network of the ribs. Further, these perforators, with lengths that range from 4 to 8 cm, are able to provide the torsion required during surgery. The loose connective tissue about these perforators also reinforces the connection of vascularity between the periosteum of the ribs and the latissimus dorsi. Thus, elevation of a rib-latissimus dorsi composite flap is possible without any intercostal neurovascular bundles, as is required for conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps. Clinically, the rib blood flow was confirmed by bleeding from the cut edge and a postoperative bone scintiscan. Unlike conventional rib-latissimus dorsi flaps, this flap has the following advantages: 1 the choice of ribs that can be attached to the flap is extended; 2 a firmer, more mobile connection of ribs and muscle is achieved; 3 the need of a donor site thoracotomy is lessened; and, 4 postoperative pain due to intercostal nerve damage is reduced. Given these features, this flap provides a useful alternative osteomusculocutaneous flap option.

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