A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan: A potential new endpoint of cancer care

Ayumi Igarashi, Mitsunori Miyashita, Tatsuya Morita, Nobuya Akizuki, Miki Akiyama, Yutaka Shirahige, Kenji Eguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Having a sense of security about the availability of care is important for cancer patients and their families. Objectives: To develop a scale for the general population to evaluate feelings of support and security regarding cancer care, and to identify factors associated with a sense of security. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to 8000 subjects in four areas of Japan. Sense of security was measured using five statements and using a seven-point Likert scale: "If I get cancer 1) I would feel secure in receiving cancer treatment, 2) my pain would be well relieved, 3) medical staff will adequately respond to my concerns and pain, 4) I would feel secure as a variety of medical care services are available, and 5) I would feel secure in receiving care at home." We performed an exploratory factor analysis as well as uni- and multivariate analyses to examine factors associated with such a sense of security. Results: The five items regarding sense of security were aggregated into one factor, and Cronbach's α was 0.91. In the Yamagata area where palliative care services were not available, the sense of security was significantly lower than in the other three regions. Female gender (P = 0.035), older age (P < 0.001), and having cancer (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with a strong sense of security. Conclusion: A new scale that evaluates sense of security with regard to cancer care was developed. Future studies should examine whether establishing a regional health care system that provides quality palliative care could improve the sense of security of the general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-225
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Feb

Fingerprint

Japan
Emotions
Neoplasms
Palliative Care
Pain
Quality of Health Care
Medical Staff
Home Care Services
Population
Statistical Factor Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • general population
  • palliative care
  • quality of care
  • region
  • Sense of security

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan : A potential new endpoint of cancer care. / Igarashi, Ayumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 43, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 218-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Igarashi, Ayumi ; Miyashita, Mitsunori ; Morita, Tatsuya ; Akizuki, Nobuya ; Akiyama, Miki ; Shirahige, Yutaka ; Eguchi, Kenji. / A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan : A potential new endpoint of cancer care. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2012 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 218-225.
@article{dc0321f9c79c4c518a14b7db901b113d,
title = "A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan: A potential new endpoint of cancer care",
abstract = "Context: Having a sense of security about the availability of care is important for cancer patients and their families. Objectives: To develop a scale for the general population to evaluate feelings of support and security regarding cancer care, and to identify factors associated with a sense of security. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to 8000 subjects in four areas of Japan. Sense of security was measured using five statements and using a seven-point Likert scale: {"}If I get cancer 1) I would feel secure in receiving cancer treatment, 2) my pain would be well relieved, 3) medical staff will adequately respond to my concerns and pain, 4) I would feel secure as a variety of medical care services are available, and 5) I would feel secure in receiving care at home.{"} We performed an exploratory factor analysis as well as uni- and multivariate analyses to examine factors associated with such a sense of security. Results: The five items regarding sense of security were aggregated into one factor, and Cronbach's α was 0.91. In the Yamagata area where palliative care services were not available, the sense of security was significantly lower than in the other three regions. Female gender (P = 0.035), older age (P < 0.001), and having cancer (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with a strong sense of security. Conclusion: A new scale that evaluates sense of security with regard to cancer care was developed. Future studies should examine whether establishing a regional health care system that provides quality palliative care could improve the sense of security of the general population.",
keywords = "general population, palliative care, quality of care, region, Sense of security",
author = "Ayumi Igarashi and Mitsunori Miyashita and Tatsuya Morita and Nobuya Akizuki and Miki Akiyama and Yutaka Shirahige and Kenji Eguchi",
year = "2012",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.04.005",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "218--225",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management",
issn = "0885-3924",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan

T2 - A potential new endpoint of cancer care

AU - Igarashi, Ayumi

AU - Miyashita, Mitsunori

AU - Morita, Tatsuya

AU - Akizuki, Nobuya

AU - Akiyama, Miki

AU - Shirahige, Yutaka

AU - Eguchi, Kenji

PY - 2012/2

Y1 - 2012/2

N2 - Context: Having a sense of security about the availability of care is important for cancer patients and their families. Objectives: To develop a scale for the general population to evaluate feelings of support and security regarding cancer care, and to identify factors associated with a sense of security. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to 8000 subjects in four areas of Japan. Sense of security was measured using five statements and using a seven-point Likert scale: "If I get cancer 1) I would feel secure in receiving cancer treatment, 2) my pain would be well relieved, 3) medical staff will adequately respond to my concerns and pain, 4) I would feel secure as a variety of medical care services are available, and 5) I would feel secure in receiving care at home." We performed an exploratory factor analysis as well as uni- and multivariate analyses to examine factors associated with such a sense of security. Results: The five items regarding sense of security were aggregated into one factor, and Cronbach's α was 0.91. In the Yamagata area where palliative care services were not available, the sense of security was significantly lower than in the other three regions. Female gender (P = 0.035), older age (P < 0.001), and having cancer (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with a strong sense of security. Conclusion: A new scale that evaluates sense of security with regard to cancer care was developed. Future studies should examine whether establishing a regional health care system that provides quality palliative care could improve the sense of security of the general population.

AB - Context: Having a sense of security about the availability of care is important for cancer patients and their families. Objectives: To develop a scale for the general population to evaluate feelings of support and security regarding cancer care, and to identify factors associated with a sense of security. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to 8000 subjects in four areas of Japan. Sense of security was measured using five statements and using a seven-point Likert scale: "If I get cancer 1) I would feel secure in receiving cancer treatment, 2) my pain would be well relieved, 3) medical staff will adequately respond to my concerns and pain, 4) I would feel secure as a variety of medical care services are available, and 5) I would feel secure in receiving care at home." We performed an exploratory factor analysis as well as uni- and multivariate analyses to examine factors associated with such a sense of security. Results: The five items regarding sense of security were aggregated into one factor, and Cronbach's α was 0.91. In the Yamagata area where palliative care services were not available, the sense of security was significantly lower than in the other three regions. Female gender (P = 0.035), older age (P < 0.001), and having cancer (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with a strong sense of security. Conclusion: A new scale that evaluates sense of security with regard to cancer care was developed. Future studies should examine whether establishing a regional health care system that provides quality palliative care could improve the sense of security of the general population.

KW - general population

KW - palliative care

KW - quality of care

KW - region

KW - Sense of security

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84855867261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84855867261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.04.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.04.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 21945131

AN - SCOPUS:84855867261

VL - 43

SP - 218

EP - 225

JO - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

JF - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

SN - 0885-3924

IS - 2

ER -