A Shape Optimisation with the Isogeometric Boundary Element Method and Adjoint Variable Method for the Three-Dimensional Helmholtz Equation

Toru Takahashi, Daisuke Sato, Hiroshi Isakari, Toshiro Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents a shape optimisation system to design the shape of an acoustically-hard object in the three-dimensional open space. The boundary element method (BEM) is suitable to analyse such an exterior field. However, the conventional BEM, which is based on piecewise polynomial shape and approximate (interpolation) functions, can require many design variables because they are usually chosen as a part of the nodes of the underlying boundary element mesh. In addition, it is not easy for the conventional method to compute the gradient of the sound pressure on the surface, which is necessary to compute the shape derivative of our interest, of a given object. To overcome these issues, we employ the isogeometric boundary element method (IGBEM), which was developed in our previous work. With using the IGBEM, we can design the shape of surfaces through control points of the NURBS surfaces of the target object. We integrate the IGBEM with the nonlinear programming software through the adjoint variable method (AVM), where the resulting adjoint boundary value problem can be also solved by the IGBEM with a slight modification. The numerical verification and demonstration validate our shape optimisation framework.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103126
JournalCAD Computer Aided Design
Volume142
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan

Keywords

  • Adjoint variable method
  • Boundary element method
  • Isogeometric analysis
  • Nonlinear programming problem
  • Shape optimisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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