A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces

Shigeyoshi Iizuka, Katsuhiko Ogawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We conducted a series of experiments to measure back distance, the distance behind a user that permits the user to manipulate personal information on a computer with a sense of security in public spaces. We assessed how the distance was affected by the type of personal information and the presence or absence of a partition that was sufficiently high to conceal the screen, then considered how these factors affected the user's sense of security in handling sensitive information. In this paper, we will highlight the key findings that emerged from the study: "when handling information that the user is not overly concerned whether it is observed or not, the presence or absence of a back partition does not affect the user's sense of security one way or the other; for the four types of personal information defined in this study, we observed significant differences or tendencies in the user's sense of security depending on the type of information; and, to support the handling of sensitive information with a genuine sense of security, it is not enough to merely shield the on-screen data from visibility by people in the vicinity, it also requires a certain amount of distance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006
Pages140-147
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 2006 Nov 202006 Nov 22

Other

Other42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period06/11/2006/11/22

Fingerprint

public space
sense of security
Visibility
Experiments
experiment

Keywords

  • Public space
  • Reassurance
  • Work environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Iizuka, S., & Ogawa, K. (2006). A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces. In 42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006 (pp. 140-147)

A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces. / Iizuka, Shigeyoshi; Ogawa, Katsuhiko.

42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006. 2006. p. 140-147.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Iizuka, S & Ogawa, K 2006, A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces. in 42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006. pp. 140-147, 42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 06/11/20.
Iizuka S, Ogawa K. A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces. In 42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006. 2006. p. 140-147
Iizuka, Shigeyoshi ; Ogawa, Katsuhiko. / A study of perceived distance required behind Japanese computer users in public spaces. 42nd Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2006, HFESA 2006. 2006. pp. 140-147
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