A template for informed consent forms in medical examination and treatment

An intervention study

Yoshiyuki Takimoto, Shoichi Maeda, Brian Taylor Slingsby, Kenji Harada, Takahide Nagase, Hirokazu Nagawa, Ryozo Naga, Akira Akabayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are few studies to use a template to ensure that information provided to the patient in the process of informed consent is consistent. To examine the differences between informed consent forms based on a template and those not based on a template. Material/Methods: An intervention study using a template for informed consent forms that could be modified according to test/treatment, specialty, setting and patient. Our sample included 22 departments at the University of Tokyo Hospital, a 1100-bed care referral center. Twelve items in each informed consent form were scored. Items included diagnosis and current condition, purpose of procedure, details and nature of procedure, effectiveness, patient specific information, changing one's mind, and the use of illustrations and figures. The 36 possible points for each form were summed for a total possible score of 108 points. Total scores and scores for each item were then compared between pre- and post-test forms. Results: Total number of points significantly increased from 70.9 to 96.9 between pre- and post intervention (p<0.001, paired t test). Internal medicine (pre: 68.6 to post: 101.9) showed a more significant increase in score than surgery (71.9 to 95.2) (ANOVA, pre-post: F(1, 106)=324.8 p<0.001; interaction: F(1,106)=11.2, p<0.01). There was no difference in the rate of improvement between treatment and examination forms (ANOVA, pre-post: F(1, 106)=253.3, p<0.001; interaction: F(1,106)=2.8, p=0.1). Conclusions: A template can increase the number of items described and the thoroughness in which they are described.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedical Science Monitor
Volume13
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Consent Forms
Analysis of Variance
Tokyo
Internal Medicine
Informed Consent
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • Bioethics
  • Informed consent
  • Intervention study
  • Research ethics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Takimoto, Y., Maeda, S., Slingsby, B. T., Harada, K., Nagase, T., Nagawa, H., ... Akabayashi, A. (2007). A template for informed consent forms in medical examination and treatment: An intervention study. Medical Science Monitor, 13(8).

A template for informed consent forms in medical examination and treatment : An intervention study. / Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Shoichi; Slingsby, Brian Taylor; Harada, Kenji; Nagase, Takahide; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Naga, Ryozo; Akabayashi, Akira.

In: Medical Science Monitor, Vol. 13, No. 8, 08.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takimoto, Y, Maeda, S, Slingsby, BT, Harada, K, Nagase, T, Nagawa, H, Naga, R & Akabayashi, A 2007, 'A template for informed consent forms in medical examination and treatment: An intervention study', Medical Science Monitor, vol. 13, no. 8.
Takimoto, Yoshiyuki ; Maeda, Shoichi ; Slingsby, Brian Taylor ; Harada, Kenji ; Nagase, Takahide ; Nagawa, Hirokazu ; Naga, Ryozo ; Akabayashi, Akira. / A template for informed consent forms in medical examination and treatment : An intervention study. In: Medical Science Monitor. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 8.
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