Acetone excretion into urine of workers exposed to acetone in acetate fiber plants

Toshihiko Satoh, Kazuyuki Omae, Toru Takebayashi, Hiroshi Nakashima, Toshiaki Higashi, Haruhiko Sakurai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To develop a proper protocol for biological exposure monitoring of acetone, we evaluated whether exposure to acetone on the previous day affects the biological monitoring value at the end of a work day. One hundred and ten male workers exposed to acetone in three acetate fiber manufacturing plants were monitored using a liquid passive sampler on two consecutive working days after 2 days without exposure. Urine samples were collected at the start of the workshift and the end of the shift on both days for each subject. For ten exposed workers urine samples were collected approximately every 2 h during and after the first working day until the following morning. Acetone concentrations in urine (Cu) at the start of the first working day were 1.3 ± 2.4 (range: ND-14.1) mg/l in nonexposed workers and 2.4 ± 5.6 (range: ND-40.3) mg/l in exposed workers. The urinary acetone concentration at the beginning of the second working day indicated that urinary levels of acetone do not decline to background level by the following morning when exposure concentration exceeds 300 ppm. However, linear regression analysis demonstrated that the relationship between environmental exposure level and urine level was similar on the 1st day and the 2nd day. Thus, although urine acetone levels did not return completely to baseline after high exposures, under the present exposure levels the exposure on the previous day did not significantly affect urinary acetone at the end of the workshift of the next day.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-134
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Mar

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Acetone
Acetates
Urine
Environmental Monitoring
Environmental Exposure
Linear Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Accumulation
  • Acetone
  • Biological monitoring
  • Sampling time
  • Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Acetone excretion into urine of workers exposed to acetone in acetate fiber plants. / Satoh, Toshihiko; Omae, Kazuyuki; Takebayashi, Toru; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Higashi, Toshiaki; Sakurai, Haruhiko.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 67, No. 2, 03.1995, p. 131-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satoh, Toshihiko ; Omae, Kazuyuki ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Nakashima, Hiroshi ; Higashi, Toshiaki ; Sakurai, Haruhiko. / Acetone excretion into urine of workers exposed to acetone in acetate fiber plants. In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 1995 ; Vol. 67, No. 2. pp. 131-134.
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