Achievement of one-child fertility in rural areas of Jilin Province, China

Noriko Tsuya, M. K. Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The total fertility rate for the rural areas of Jilin Province, China, fell from two children per woman to the unprecedently low level of one between 1982 and 1985. This rapid decline was mainly due to the curtailment of childbearing after first births among young married women in response to the government's one-child family policy. Logistic regression analyses show that women whose only child is a boy, whose ideal number of children is one or whose husbands have some formal education, as well as women who belong to the Han majority, are more likely than others to accept a one-child certificate. Among women in their 20s, those with a formal education are less likely than those with no formal education to accept a certificate, but among older women, the relationship between education and certificate acceptance is positive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-130
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Family Planning Perspectives
Volume14
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Fertility
fertility
rural area
China
certification
Family Planning Policy
education
Education
only child
family policy
fertility rate
childbearing
number of children
Birth Order
Birth Rate
Only Child
husband
wife
Spouses
acceptance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Demography

Cite this

Achievement of one-child fertility in rural areas of Jilin Province, China. / Tsuya, Noriko; Choe, M. K.

In: International Family Planning Perspectives, Vol. 14, No. 4, 1988, p. 122-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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