Activation of right insular cortex during imaginary speech articulation

Yutaka Kato, Taro Muramatsu, Motoichiro Kato, Masuro Shintani, Haruo Kashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human speech articulation is a complex process controlled by a form of 'programming' implemented in the brain. Analysis of speech articulation using neuroimaging techniques is difficult, however, because motor noise is time-locked to the articulatory events. The current magnetoencephalography study, in which 12 participants were required to imagine vocalizing a phonogram after a visual cue, was designed to visualize the prearticulatory 'automatic' processes corresponding to the motor initiation. Magnetic activity correlating with the preparation for articulation occurred in the insular cortices at about 160 ms after the visual cue, and had a relative dominance in the right hemisphere. This suggests that motor control of speech proceeds from the insular regions, although the 'automatic' nature of our task might have led to the observed right-sided dominance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-509
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroReport
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Mar

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Cerebral Cortex
Cues
Magnetoencephalography
Neuroimaging
Noise
Brain

Keywords

  • Articulation disorders
  • Cerebral cortex
  • Evoked potentials: motor
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Speech

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Activation of right insular cortex during imaginary speech articulation. / Kato, Yutaka; Muramatsu, Taro; Kato, Motoichiro; Shintani, Masuro; Kashima, Haruo.

In: NeuroReport, Vol. 18, No. 5, 03.2007, p. 505-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kato, Yutaka ; Muramatsu, Taro ; Kato, Motoichiro ; Shintani, Masuro ; Kashima, Haruo. / Activation of right insular cortex during imaginary speech articulation. In: NeuroReport. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 505-509.
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