Age-Related Trends in Home Blood Pressure, Home Pulse Rate, and Day-to-Day Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Variability Based on Longitudinal Cohort Data: The Ohasama Study

Michihiro Satoh, Hirohito Metoki, Kei Asayama, Takahisa Murakami, Ryusuke Inoue, Megumi Tsubota-Utsugi, Ayako Matsuda, Takuo Hirose, Azusa Hara, Taku Obara, Masahiro Kikuya, Kyoko Nomura, Atsushi Hozawa, Yutaka Imai, Takayoshi Ohkubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Home blood pressure is a more accurate prognosticator than office blood pressure and allows the observation of day-to-day blood pressure variability. Information on blood pressure change during the life course links the prediction of blood pressure elevation with age. We prospectively assessed age-related trends in home blood pressure, home pulse rate, and their day-to-day variability evaluated as a coefficient of variation. Methods and Results: We examined 1665 participants (men, 36.0%; mean age, 56.2 years) from the general population of Ohasama, Japan. A repeated-measures mixed linear model was used to estimate the age-related trends. In a mean of 15.9 years, we observed 5438 points of measurements including those at baseline. The home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age and was higher in men than in women aged <70 years. There was an inverse-U-shaped age-related trend in home diastolic blood pressure. The day-to-day home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age in individuals aged >40 years. However, an U-shaped age-related trend in day-to-day diastolic blood pressure variability with the nadir point at 65 to 69 years of age was observed. No significant sex differences in the day-to-day blood pressure variability were observed (P≥0.22). The average and day-to-day variability of home pulse rate decreased with age but were lower and higher, respectively, in men than in women. Conclusions: The current descriptive data are needed to predict future home blood pressure and pulse rate. The data also provide information on the mechanism of day-to-day blood pressure and pulse rate variability.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere012121
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug 6

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Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Sex Characteristics
Linear Models
Japan
Observation

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • blood pressure measurement/monitoring
  • epidemiology
  • heart rate/heart rate variability
  • home blood pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Age-Related Trends in Home Blood Pressure, Home Pulse Rate, and Day-to-Day Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Variability Based on Longitudinal Cohort Data : The Ohasama Study. / Satoh, Michihiro; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Murakami, Takahisa; Inoue, Ryusuke; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Matsuda, Ayako; Hirose, Takuo; Hara, Azusa; Obara, Taku; Kikuya, Masahiro; Nomura, Kyoko; Hozawa, Atsushi; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 8, No. 15, e012121, 06.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satoh, M, Metoki, H, Asayama, K, Murakami, T, Inoue, R, Tsubota-Utsugi, M, Matsuda, A, Hirose, T, Hara, A, Obara, T, Kikuya, M, Nomura, K, Hozawa, A, Imai, Y & Ohkubo, T 2019, 'Age-Related Trends in Home Blood Pressure, Home Pulse Rate, and Day-to-Day Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Variability Based on Longitudinal Cohort Data: The Ohasama Study', Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 8, no. 15, e012121. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.119.012121
Satoh, Michihiro ; Metoki, Hirohito ; Asayama, Kei ; Murakami, Takahisa ; Inoue, Ryusuke ; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi ; Matsuda, Ayako ; Hirose, Takuo ; Hara, Azusa ; Obara, Taku ; Kikuya, Masahiro ; Nomura, Kyoko ; Hozawa, Atsushi ; Imai, Yutaka ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi. / Age-Related Trends in Home Blood Pressure, Home Pulse Rate, and Day-to-Day Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Variability Based on Longitudinal Cohort Data : The Ohasama Study. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 15.
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abstract = "Background: Home blood pressure is a more accurate prognosticator than office blood pressure and allows the observation of day-to-day blood pressure variability. Information on blood pressure change during the life course links the prediction of blood pressure elevation with age. We prospectively assessed age-related trends in home blood pressure, home pulse rate, and their day-to-day variability evaluated as a coefficient of variation. Methods and Results: We examined 1665 participants (men, 36.0{\%}; mean age, 56.2 years) from the general population of Ohasama, Japan. A repeated-measures mixed linear model was used to estimate the age-related trends. In a mean of 15.9 years, we observed 5438 points of measurements including those at baseline. The home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age and was higher in men than in women aged <70 years. There was an inverse-U-shaped age-related trend in home diastolic blood pressure. The day-to-day home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age in individuals aged >40 years. However, an U-shaped age-related trend in day-to-day diastolic blood pressure variability with the nadir point at 65 to 69 years of age was observed. No significant sex differences in the day-to-day blood pressure variability were observed (P≥0.22). The average and day-to-day variability of home pulse rate decreased with age but were lower and higher, respectively, in men than in women. Conclusions: The current descriptive data are needed to predict future home blood pressure and pulse rate. The data also provide information on the mechanism of day-to-day blood pressure and pulse rate variability.",
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AU - Satoh, Michihiro

AU - Metoki, Hirohito

AU - Asayama, Kei

AU - Murakami, Takahisa

AU - Inoue, Ryusuke

AU - Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi

AU - Matsuda, Ayako

AU - Hirose, Takuo

AU - Hara, Azusa

AU - Obara, Taku

AU - Kikuya, Masahiro

AU - Nomura, Kyoko

AU - Hozawa, Atsushi

AU - Imai, Yutaka

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

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N2 - Background: Home blood pressure is a more accurate prognosticator than office blood pressure and allows the observation of day-to-day blood pressure variability. Information on blood pressure change during the life course links the prediction of blood pressure elevation with age. We prospectively assessed age-related trends in home blood pressure, home pulse rate, and their day-to-day variability evaluated as a coefficient of variation. Methods and Results: We examined 1665 participants (men, 36.0%; mean age, 56.2 years) from the general population of Ohasama, Japan. A repeated-measures mixed linear model was used to estimate the age-related trends. In a mean of 15.9 years, we observed 5438 points of measurements including those at baseline. The home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age and was higher in men than in women aged <70 years. There was an inverse-U-shaped age-related trend in home diastolic blood pressure. The day-to-day home systolic blood pressure linearly increased with age in individuals aged >40 years. However, an U-shaped age-related trend in day-to-day diastolic blood pressure variability with the nadir point at 65 to 69 years of age was observed. No significant sex differences in the day-to-day blood pressure variability were observed (P≥0.22). The average and day-to-day variability of home pulse rate decreased with age but were lower and higher, respectively, in men than in women. Conclusions: The current descriptive data are needed to predict future home blood pressure and pulse rate. The data also provide information on the mechanism of day-to-day blood pressure and pulse rate variability.

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