Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for regression and haze after photorefractive keratectomy

Hao Yung Yang, Hiroshi Fujishima, Ikuko Toda, Seiji Itoh, Hiroko Bissen-Miyajima, Jun Shimazaki, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between allergic conjunctivitis and the results of photorefractive keratectomy performed with an excimer laser in myopic eyes. METHODS: Fifty-seven myopic eyes in 57 Japanese patients were classified into three groups: a normal group (30 eyes of 30 patients), a treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that were treated with fluorometholone and cromolyn sodium eyedrops from month 3 until the end of the 12- to 18-month follow-up period (16 eyes of 16 patients), and a no-treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that received no allergic treatment until the end of the follow-up period (11 eyes of 11 patients). Preoperative and postoperative examinations included evaluation of corrected and uncorrected visual acuity and grading of corneal haze. RESULTS: In the no-treatment group, the mean corneal haze score ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.98 was significantly greater than the normal group score of 0.38 ± 0.49 (P = .02). There was no significant difference in the haze score between the treated and normal groups. A refractive outcome of ± 1 diopter was obtained in 30 (100%) of the 30 patients in the normal group, 15 (93.8%) of 16 patients in the treatment group, and four (36.4%) of the 11 patients in the no-treatment group. Visual acuity was 20/40 or better after photorefractive keratectomy in 30 patients (100%) in the normal group, 15 patients (93.8%) in the treatment group, and six patients (54.5%) in the no- treatment group. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that untreated allergic conjunctivitis is a significant risk factor for haze and myopic regression after photorefractive keratectomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-58
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Jan

Fingerprint

Photorefractive Keratectomy
Allergic Conjunctivitis
Therapeutics
Visual Acuity
Fluorometholone
Cromolyn Sodium
Excimer Lasers
Ophthalmic Solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for regression and haze after photorefractive keratectomy. / Yang, Hao Yung; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Toda, Ikuko; Itoh, Seiji; Bissen-Miyajima, Hiroko; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsubota, Kazuo.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.1998, p. 54-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Hao Yung ; Fujishima, Hiroshi ; Toda, Ikuko ; Itoh, Seiji ; Bissen-Miyajima, Hiroko ; Shimazaki, Jun ; Tsubota, Kazuo. / Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for regression and haze after photorefractive keratectomy. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 1998 ; Vol. 125, No. 1. pp. 54-58.
@article{49335d53cbe246389f8d4a398715ee01,
title = "Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for regression and haze after photorefractive keratectomy",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between allergic conjunctivitis and the results of photorefractive keratectomy performed with an excimer laser in myopic eyes. METHODS: Fifty-seven myopic eyes in 57 Japanese patients were classified into three groups: a normal group (30 eyes of 30 patients), a treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that were treated with fluorometholone and cromolyn sodium eyedrops from month 3 until the end of the 12- to 18-month follow-up period (16 eyes of 16 patients), and a no-treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that received no allergic treatment until the end of the follow-up period (11 eyes of 11 patients). Preoperative and postoperative examinations included evaluation of corrected and uncorrected visual acuity and grading of corneal haze. RESULTS: In the no-treatment group, the mean corneal haze score ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.98 was significantly greater than the normal group score of 0.38 ± 0.49 (P = .02). There was no significant difference in the haze score between the treated and normal groups. A refractive outcome of ± 1 diopter was obtained in 30 (100{\%}) of the 30 patients in the normal group, 15 (93.8{\%}) of 16 patients in the treatment group, and four (36.4{\%}) of the 11 patients in the no-treatment group. Visual acuity was 20/40 or better after photorefractive keratectomy in 30 patients (100{\%}) in the normal group, 15 patients (93.8{\%}) in the treatment group, and six patients (54.5{\%}) in the no- treatment group. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that untreated allergic conjunctivitis is a significant risk factor for haze and myopic regression after photorefractive keratectomy.",
author = "Yang, {Hao Yung} and Hiroshi Fujishima and Ikuko Toda and Seiji Itoh and Hiroko Bissen-Miyajima and Jun Shimazaki and Kazuo Tsubota",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9394(99)80234-7",
language = "English",
volume = "125",
pages = "54--58",
journal = "American Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0002-9394",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for regression and haze after photorefractive keratectomy

AU - Yang, Hao Yung

AU - Fujishima, Hiroshi

AU - Toda, Ikuko

AU - Itoh, Seiji

AU - Bissen-Miyajima, Hiroko

AU - Shimazaki, Jun

AU - Tsubota, Kazuo

PY - 1998/1

Y1 - 1998/1

N2 - PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between allergic conjunctivitis and the results of photorefractive keratectomy performed with an excimer laser in myopic eyes. METHODS: Fifty-seven myopic eyes in 57 Japanese patients were classified into three groups: a normal group (30 eyes of 30 patients), a treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that were treated with fluorometholone and cromolyn sodium eyedrops from month 3 until the end of the 12- to 18-month follow-up period (16 eyes of 16 patients), and a no-treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that received no allergic treatment until the end of the follow-up period (11 eyes of 11 patients). Preoperative and postoperative examinations included evaluation of corrected and uncorrected visual acuity and grading of corneal haze. RESULTS: In the no-treatment group, the mean corneal haze score ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.98 was significantly greater than the normal group score of 0.38 ± 0.49 (P = .02). There was no significant difference in the haze score between the treated and normal groups. A refractive outcome of ± 1 diopter was obtained in 30 (100%) of the 30 patients in the normal group, 15 (93.8%) of 16 patients in the treatment group, and four (36.4%) of the 11 patients in the no-treatment group. Visual acuity was 20/40 or better after photorefractive keratectomy in 30 patients (100%) in the normal group, 15 patients (93.8%) in the treatment group, and six patients (54.5%) in the no- treatment group. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that untreated allergic conjunctivitis is a significant risk factor for haze and myopic regression after photorefractive keratectomy.

AB - PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between allergic conjunctivitis and the results of photorefractive keratectomy performed with an excimer laser in myopic eyes. METHODS: Fifty-seven myopic eyes in 57 Japanese patients were classified into three groups: a normal group (30 eyes of 30 patients), a treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that were treated with fluorometholone and cromolyn sodium eyedrops from month 3 until the end of the 12- to 18-month follow-up period (16 eyes of 16 patients), and a no-treatment group composed of eyes with allergic conjunctivitis that received no allergic treatment until the end of the follow-up period (11 eyes of 11 patients). Preoperative and postoperative examinations included evaluation of corrected and uncorrected visual acuity and grading of corneal haze. RESULTS: In the no-treatment group, the mean corneal haze score ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.98 was significantly greater than the normal group score of 0.38 ± 0.49 (P = .02). There was no significant difference in the haze score between the treated and normal groups. A refractive outcome of ± 1 diopter was obtained in 30 (100%) of the 30 patients in the normal group, 15 (93.8%) of 16 patients in the treatment group, and four (36.4%) of the 11 patients in the no-treatment group. Visual acuity was 20/40 or better after photorefractive keratectomy in 30 patients (100%) in the normal group, 15 patients (93.8%) in the treatment group, and six patients (54.5%) in the no- treatment group. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that untreated allergic conjunctivitis is a significant risk factor for haze and myopic regression after photorefractive keratectomy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031985886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031985886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9394(99)80234-7

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9394(99)80234-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 9437313

AN - SCOPUS:0031985886

VL - 125

SP - 54

EP - 58

JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

IS - 1

ER -