An epidural cooling catheter protects the spinal cord against ischemic injury in pigs

Atsuo Mori, Toshihiko Ueda, Takashi Hachiya, Nobuyuki Kabei, Hideyuki Okano, Ryohei Yozu, Tatsuumi Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Using swine, we investigated whether epidural placement of a cooling catheter rather than infusing iced saline solution could protect the spinal cord from ischemia during aortic surgery. Methods. We divided 14 domestic pigs into two groups of 7 each. Each underwent epidural catheter placement preceding 30 minutes of aortic cross-clamping distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery. In group 1, cold water was circulated continuously through the lumen of the catheter connected to an external unit. In group 2, animals received catheter placement without cooling. Spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded. Neurologic status involving hind limbs was graded sequentially after surgery. Results. At aortic cross-clamping, spinal temperature in group 1 (31.7° ± 0.6°C) was significantly lower than in group 2 (37.8° ± 0.4°C; p < 0.0001). No significant elevation of intrathecal pressure accompanied cooling with the catheter (group 1, 8.1 ± 1.7 mm Hg; group 2, 8.0 ± 1.5 mm Hg). Mean duration of total loss of potentials was significantly shorter in group 1 (7.4 ± 3.8 minutes) than group 2 (19.7 ± 7.3 minutes; p = 0.0002). Pigs in group 1 exhibited better hind limb function recovery (mean Tarlov score, 4.7 ± 0.5) than group 2 (0.6 ± 0.8; p = 0.0017). Group 1 showed normal histologic characteristics, whereas group 2 showed loss of motor neurons in the ventral horns. Conclusions. Epidural cooling catheter without iced saline infusion can cool the spinal cord without elevating intrathecal pressure, protecting the cord against ischemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1829-1833
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume80
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord
Swine
Catheters
Wounds and Injuries
Constriction
Extremities
Spinal Cord Ischemia
Pressure
Sus scrofa
Subclavian Artery
Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Recovery of Function
Motor Neurons
Horns
Sodium Chloride
Nervous System
Ischemia
Temperature
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

An epidural cooling catheter protects the spinal cord against ischemic injury in pigs. / Mori, Atsuo; Ueda, Toshihiko; Hachiya, Takashi; Kabei, Nobuyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Yozu, Ryohei; Sasaki, Tatsuumi.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 80, No. 5, 11.2005, p. 1829-1833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mori, Atsuo ; Ueda, Toshihiko ; Hachiya, Takashi ; Kabei, Nobuyuki ; Okano, Hideyuki ; Yozu, Ryohei ; Sasaki, Tatsuumi. / An epidural cooling catheter protects the spinal cord against ischemic injury in pigs. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2005 ; Vol. 80, No. 5. pp. 1829-1833.
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