Analysis of the relationship between the HbA1c screening results and the development and worsening of diabetes among adults aged over 40 years: a 4-year follow-up study of 140,000 people in Japan – the Shizuoka study

Shuhei Nomura, Haruka Sakamoto, Santosh Kumar Rauniyar, Koki Shimada, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, Shun Kohsaka, Nao Ichihara, Hiraku Kumamaru, Hiroaki Miyata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are routinely measured during health check-ups and are used as an indicator of glycemic control in Japan. However, only a few studies have followed up individuals to assess the risk of diabetes development and worsening based on HbA1c screening results. This study evaluated the relationship between HbA1c screening results and the risk of diabetes development and worsening. Methods: Data were collected from the Shizuoka Kokuho Database, a Japanese administrative claims database of insured individuals aged > 40 years. We included individuals available for follow-up from April 2012 to March 2018 who had not received any diabetes treatment before March 2014. HbA1c screening results were categorized into 4 groups based on the HbA1c levels at the 2012 and 2013 health check-ups: group A, those whose HbA1c levels were < 6.5% in 2012 and 2013; group B, those whose HbA1c levels > 6.5% in 2012 but < 6.5% in 2013; group C, those whose HbA1c levels were > 6.5% in 2012 and 2013; and group D, those whose HbA1c levels were < 6.5% in 2012 and > 6.5% in 2013. Logistic regression models were used to analyze diabetes development and worsening, defined as the initiation of diabetes treatment by March 2018 and the use of injection drugs by participants who initiated diabetes treatment by March 2018. Results: Overall, 137,852 individuals were analyzed. After adjusting for covariates, compared with group A, group B was more likely to initiate treatment within 4 years (odds ratio: 22.64; 95% confidence interval: 14.66–34.99). In patients who initiated diabetes treatment by March 2018, injection drugs were less likely used by group D than by group A (odds ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.12–0.61). Conclusions: Our study suggests that although HbA1c levels measured during health check-ups were correlated with the risk of diabetes development and worsening, HbA1c levels in a single year may not necessarily provide sufficient information to consider these future risks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1880
JournalBMC public health
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Keywords

  • Claims data
  • Diabetes
  • Follow-ups
  • Health check-ups
  • Japan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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