[Angiotensin receptor vaccines].

Hiroyuki Sasamura, Tatsuhiko Azegami, Hiroshi Itoh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Recent clinical studies have shown that RAS inhibitors are effective not only for the prevention of end-organ damage in hypertensive patients, but also for prevention of new-onset hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation. Vaccines against the RAS have been developed since the 1950s, and a recent phase IIa placebo-controlled study has confirmed that an angiotensin vaccine causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients. The results of animal experiments from our and other laboratories have suggested that vaccination against the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, and also ameliorates hypertensive end-organ damage. The angiotensin receptor may therefore be an important target for the development of vaccines for the prevention of hypertension and related complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1633-1638
Number of pages6
JournalNihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
Volume69
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Angiotensin Receptors
Vaccines
Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor
Angiotensins
Atrial Fibrillation
Diabetes Mellitus
Vaccination
Animal Models
Placebos

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

[Angiotensin receptor vaccines]. / Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi.

In: Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, Vol. 69, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 1633-1638.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{9a6e4fba486c4cf0a80d378efbdeb64b,
title = "[Angiotensin receptor vaccines].",
abstract = "Recent clinical studies have shown that RAS inhibitors are effective not only for the prevention of end-organ damage in hypertensive patients, but also for prevention of new-onset hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation. Vaccines against the RAS have been developed since the 1950s, and a recent phase IIa placebo-controlled study has confirmed that an angiotensin vaccine causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients. The results of animal experiments from our and other laboratories have suggested that vaccination against the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, and also ameliorates hypertensive end-organ damage. The angiotensin receptor may therefore be an important target for the development of vaccines for the prevention of hypertension and related complications.",
author = "Hiroyuki Sasamura and Tatsuhiko Azegami and Hiroshi Itoh",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "1633--1638",
journal = "Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine",
issn = "0047-1852",
publisher = "Nipponrinsho Co., Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - [Angiotensin receptor vaccines].

AU - Sasamura, Hiroyuki

AU - Azegami, Tatsuhiko

AU - Itoh, Hiroshi

PY - 2011/9

Y1 - 2011/9

N2 - Recent clinical studies have shown that RAS inhibitors are effective not only for the prevention of end-organ damage in hypertensive patients, but also for prevention of new-onset hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation. Vaccines against the RAS have been developed since the 1950s, and a recent phase IIa placebo-controlled study has confirmed that an angiotensin vaccine causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients. The results of animal experiments from our and other laboratories have suggested that vaccination against the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, and also ameliorates hypertensive end-organ damage. The angiotensin receptor may therefore be an important target for the development of vaccines for the prevention of hypertension and related complications.

AB - Recent clinical studies have shown that RAS inhibitors are effective not only for the prevention of end-organ damage in hypertensive patients, but also for prevention of new-onset hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation. Vaccines against the RAS have been developed since the 1950s, and a recent phase IIa placebo-controlled study has confirmed that an angiotensin vaccine causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients. The results of animal experiments from our and other laboratories have suggested that vaccination against the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor causes a significant decrease in blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, and also ameliorates hypertensive end-organ damage. The angiotensin receptor may therefore be an important target for the development of vaccines for the prevention of hypertension and related complications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80155159121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80155159121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 21922766

AN - SCOPUS:80155159121

VL - 69

SP - 1633

EP - 1638

JO - Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine

JF - Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine

SN - 0047-1852

IS - 9

ER -