Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and physiological joint laxity

Earliest changes in joint stability and stiffness after reconstruction

Hideo Matsumoto, Takashi Toyoda, Makoto Kawakubo, Toshiro Otani, Yasunori Suda, Kyosuke Fujikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physiological joint laxity is an important element of normal knee joint function, providing smooth joint movement. However, the objective evaluation of post-operative results after knee ligament surgery is usually based primarily on stability and range of motion, and joint laxity has been ignored. In this study, we measured the joint stiffness of 82 knees undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the Leeds- Keio artificial ligament, before the operation, immediately after the operation, and finally when the full range of motion was achieved postoperatively; changes in joint laxity after the ACL reconstruction were investigated. Before the operation, joint laxity was greater than that of the normal side (P < 0.01), but immediately after the operation it diminished compared not only with that observed preoperatively, but also with that of the normal side. When the full range of motion was achieved, joint laxity was lower than that observed immediately after the operation (P < 0.01), but still remained higher than that of the normal side (P < 0.01). In other words, stability was achieved, but joint laxity was diminished through the operation. In this series, a stiffer artificial ligament than the natural ACL was used, and maximum tension was applied during the operation, aiming at better stability, but this may cause diminution of joint laxity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-196
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Science
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Joint Instability
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Joints
Articular Range of Motion
Ligaments
Knee
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Knee Joint

Keywords

  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
  • Laxity ACL reconstruction and joint laxity
  • Reconstruction
  • Stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and physiological joint laxity : Earliest changes in joint stability and stiffness after reconstruction. / Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyoda, Takashi; Kawakubo, Makoto; Otani, Toshiro; Suda, Yasunori; Fujikawa, Kyosuke.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Science, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1999, p. 191-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumoto, Hideo ; Toyoda, Takashi ; Kawakubo, Makoto ; Otani, Toshiro ; Suda, Yasunori ; Fujikawa, Kyosuke. / Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and physiological joint laxity : Earliest changes in joint stability and stiffness after reconstruction. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Science. 1999 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 191-196.
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