Anti-SRP myopathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Detection of autoantibodies can provide more important clinical information in assigning patients to clinical subsets, selecting a therapy and predicting prognosis. Muscle biopsy is the principal examination for a diagnosis of myositis; however, autoantibody detection is also useful. Myositis-associated autoantibodies, detected in 30% of myositis patients, can be screened by RNA immunoprecipitation assay. Some case series have revealed that the anti-SRP antibody, detected in 5-8% of polymyositis patients, was generally associated with severe and refractory polymyositis. However, it has been accepted that anti-SRP myopathy should be separated from polymyositis based on histological and clinical features. Some patients with anti-SRP myopathy show chronic progression indistinguishable from muscular dystrophy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)961-963
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Neurology
Volume51
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Muscular Diseases
Polymyositis
Myositis
Autoantibodies
Muscular Dystrophies
Immunoprecipitation
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
RNA
Biopsy
Muscles
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Autoantibodies
  • RNA immunoprecipitation
  • Signal recognition particle (SRP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Anti-SRP myopathy. / Suzuki, Shigeaki.

In: Clinical Neurology, Vol. 51, No. 11, 2011, p. 961-963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, Shigeaki. / Anti-SRP myopathy. In: Clinical Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 51, No. 11. pp. 961-963.
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