Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus

Keiko Fukushima, Sei Harada, Ayano Takeuchi, Ayako Kurihara, Miho Iida, Kota Fukai, Kazuyo Kuwabara, Suzuka Kato, Minako Matsumoto, Aya Hirata, Miki Akiyama, Masaru Tomita, Akiyoshi Hirayama, Asako Sato, Chizuru Suzuki, Masahiro Sugimoto, Tomoyoshi Soga, Daisuke Sugiyama, Tomonori Okamura, Toru Takebayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL. Results: In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group. Conclusions: BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Lipidology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

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Branched Chain Amino Acids
Dyslipidemias
Diabetes Mellitus
Population
LDL Cholesterol
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Valine
Blood Group Antigens
Leucine
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Metabolomics
Lipid Metabolism
Linear Models
Spectrum Analysis

Keywords

  • BCAA
  • CE-MS
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Metabolic dyslipidemia
  • Metabolomics
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{f81a52b98fd1477997dbbe3647e599ac,
title = "Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "Background: Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL. Results: In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group. Conclusions: BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia.",
keywords = "BCAA, CE-MS, Dyslipidemia, Metabolic dyslipidemia, Metabolomics, Sex",
author = "Keiko Fukushima and Sei Harada and Ayano Takeuchi and Ayako Kurihara and Miho Iida and Kota Fukai and Kazuyo Kuwabara and Suzuka Kato and Minako Matsumoto and Aya Hirata and Miki Akiyama and Masaru Tomita and Akiyoshi Hirayama and Asako Sato and Chizuru Suzuki and Masahiro Sugimoto and Tomoyoshi Soga and Daisuke Sugiyama and Tomonori Okamura and Toru Takebayashi",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jacl.2019.09.002",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Lipidology",
issn = "1933-2874",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus

AU - Fukushima, Keiko

AU - Harada, Sei

AU - Takeuchi, Ayano

AU - Kurihara, Ayako

AU - Iida, Miho

AU - Fukai, Kota

AU - Kuwabara, Kazuyo

AU - Kato, Suzuka

AU - Matsumoto, Minako

AU - Hirata, Aya

AU - Akiyama, Miki

AU - Tomita, Masaru

AU - Hirayama, Akiyoshi

AU - Sato, Asako

AU - Suzuki, Chizuru

AU - Sugimoto, Masahiro

AU - Soga, Tomoyoshi

AU - Sugiyama, Daisuke

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Takebayashi, Toru

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL. Results: In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group. Conclusions: BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia.

AB - Background: Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL. Results: In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group. Conclusions: BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia.

KW - BCAA

KW - CE-MS

KW - Dyslipidemia

KW - Metabolic dyslipidemia

KW - Metabolomics

KW - Sex

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jacl.2019.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jacl.2019.09.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85072851662

JO - Journal of Clinical Lipidology

JF - Journal of Clinical Lipidology

SN - 1933-2874

ER -