Association between mild cognitive impairment and trajectory-based spatial parameters during timed up and go test using a laser range sensor

Shu Nishiguchi, Ayanori Yorozu, Daiki Adachi, Masaki Takahashi, Tomoki Aoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test may be a useful tool to detect not only mobility impairment but also possible cognitive impairment. In this cross-sectional study, we used the TUG test to investigate the associations between trajectory-based spatial parameters measured by laser range sensor (LRS) and cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults. Methods: The participants were 63 community-dwelling older adults (mean age, 73.0 ± 6.3 years). The trajectory-based spatial parameters during the TUG test were measured using an LRS. In each forward and backward phase, we calculated the minimum distance from the marker, the maximum distance from the x-axis (center line), the length of the trajectories, and the area of region surrounded by the trajectory of the center of gravity and the x-axis (center line). We measured mild cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Examination score (26/27 was the cut-off score for defining mild cognitive impairment). Results: Compared with participants with normal cognitive function, those with mild cognitive impairment exhibited the following trajectory-based spatial parameters: short minimum distance from the marker (p = 0.044), narrow area of center of gravity in the forward phase (p = 0.012), and a large forward/whole phase ratio of the area of the center of gravity (p = 0.026) during the TUG test. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, a short minimum distance from the marker (odds ratio [OR]: 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.98), narrow area of the center of gravity in the forward phase (OR: 0.01, 95% CI: 0.00-0.36), and large forward/whole phase ratio of the area of the center of gravity (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.88-0.99) were independently associated with mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results indicate that some of the trajectory-based spatial parameters measured by LRS during the TUG test were independently associated with cognitive impairment in older adults. In particular, older adults with cognitive impairment exhibit shorter minimum distances from the marker and asymmetrical trajectories during the TUG test.

Original languageEnglish
Article number78
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Aug 8

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Lasers
Gravitation
Independent Living
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Laser range sensor
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Older adults
  • Timed up and go test
  • Trajectory-based spatial parameters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Association between mild cognitive impairment and trajectory-based spatial parameters during timed up and go test using a laser range sensor. / Nishiguchi, Shu; Yorozu, Ayanori; Adachi, Daiki; Takahashi, Masaki; Aoyama, Tomoki.

In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, Vol. 14, No. 1, 78, 08.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test may be a useful tool to detect not only mobility impairment but also possible cognitive impairment. In this cross-sectional study, we used the TUG test to investigate the associations between trajectory-based spatial parameters measured by laser range sensor (LRS) and cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults. Methods: The participants were 63 community-dwelling older adults (mean age, 73.0 ± 6.3 years). The trajectory-based spatial parameters during the TUG test were measured using an LRS. In each forward and backward phase, we calculated the minimum distance from the marker, the maximum distance from the x-axis (center line), the length of the trajectories, and the area of region surrounded by the trajectory of the center of gravity and the x-axis (center line). We measured mild cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Examination score (26/27 was the cut-off score for defining mild cognitive impairment). Results: Compared with participants with normal cognitive function, those with mild cognitive impairment exhibited the following trajectory-based spatial parameters: short minimum distance from the marker (p = 0.044), narrow area of center of gravity in the forward phase (p = 0.012), and a large forward/whole phase ratio of the area of the center of gravity (p = 0.026) during the TUG test. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, a short minimum distance from the marker (odds ratio [OR]: 0.82, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.98), narrow area of the center of gravity in the forward phase (OR: 0.01, 95{\%} CI: 0.00-0.36), and large forward/whole phase ratio of the area of the center of gravity (OR: 0.94, 95{\%} CI: 0.88-0.99) were independently associated with mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results indicate that some of the trajectory-based spatial parameters measured by LRS during the TUG test were independently associated with cognitive impairment in older adults. In particular, older adults with cognitive impairment exhibit shorter minimum distances from the marker and asymmetrical trajectories during the TUG test.",
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AU - Aoyama, Tomoki

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