Association between the participation of board-certified surgeons in gastroenterological surgery and operative mortality after eight gastroenterological procedures

Hiroyuki Konno, Kinji Kamiya, Hirotoshi Kikuchi, Hiroaki Miyata, Norimichi Hirahara, Mitsukazu Gotoh, Go Wakabayashi, Tetsuo Ohta, Norihiro Kokudo, Masaki Mori, Yasuyuki Seto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between the participation of board-certified surgeons in gastroenterological surgery (BCS-Gs) and the surgical outcomes of gastroenterological surgery. Methods: Data from the National Clinical Database on patients who underwent eight major gastroenterological procedures were analyzed retrospectively. First, the ratio of cases in which BCS-G were involved to the total cases was calculated for each procedure, and the impact of BCS-G involvement on surgical outcome was assessed by comparing mortality rates in the group with BCS-G involvement vs. the group without BCS-G involvement. Second, the differences in the observed/expected ratio were assessed among four hospital categories according to the available BCS-G number. Finally, the impact of the hospital BCS-G number on mortality was evaluated. Results: The ratio of BCS-G involvement ranged from 59.0 % for acute diffuse peritonitis to 89.1 % for hepatectomy, and the mortality rate was significantly lower for three procedures when BCS-Gs participated as the operator or assistant. The observed/expected ratio of hospitals with four or more BCS-Gs was less than 1.0 for all the procedures assessed. A multivariable logistic regression model showed that the hospital BCS-G number was a predictor of operative mortality. Conclusions: BCS-Gs contribute to favorable outcomes of gastroenterological surgery in Japan. The hospital BCS-G number is a surrogate marker of operative mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery Today
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 Sep 29
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mortality
Logistic Models
Hepatectomy
Peritonitis
Surgeons
Japan
Biomarkers
Databases

Keywords

  • Board-certified surgeons in gastroenterological surgery
  • National Clinical Database
  • Operative mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Association between the participation of board-certified surgeons in gastroenterological surgery and operative mortality after eight gastroenterological procedures. / Konno, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Kinji; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Miyata, Hiroaki; Hirahara, Norimichi; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Wakabayashi, Go; Ohta, Tetsuo; Kokudo, Norihiro; Mori, Masaki; Seto, Yasuyuki.

In: Surgery Today, 29.09.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Konno, Hiroyuki ; Kamiya, Kinji ; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi ; Miyata, Hiroaki ; Hirahara, Norimichi ; Gotoh, Mitsukazu ; Wakabayashi, Go ; Ohta, Tetsuo ; Kokudo, Norihiro ; Mori, Masaki ; Seto, Yasuyuki. / Association between the participation of board-certified surgeons in gastroenterological surgery and operative mortality after eight gastroenterological procedures. In: Surgery Today. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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