Associations of high-density lipoprotein particle and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with alcohol intake, smoking, and body mass index: The INTERLIPID study

INTERLIPID and INTERMAP Research Groups

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recently, high-density lipoprotein particles (HDL-P) have been found to be more strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk than their counterpart, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Given that lifestyle is among the first targets in CAD prevention, we compared the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with selected lifestyle factors. Methods and Results: We examined 789 Japanese participants of the INTERLIPID Study: men (n=386) and women (n=403) aged 40–59 years in 1996–1998. Participants treated for dyslipidemias were excluded. Lifestyle factors included alcohol intake, smoking amount, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable linear regression was used for cross-sectional analyses of these factors with HDL-P, HDL-C, HDL-P size subclasses (small, medium and large) and mean HDL-P size. In men, higher alcohol intake was associated with higher HDL-P and higher HDL-C. The associations of alcohol, however, were strongest with HDL-P. A higher smoking amount tended to be associated with lower HDL-P and HDL-C. In contrast, BMI was not associated with HDL-P, but was strongly inversely associated with HDL-C. While alcohol intake favored larger mean HDL-P size, smoking and BMI favored a lipid profile with smaller HDL-P subclasses and overall smaller mean HDL-P size. Similar, but generally weaker results were observed in women. Conclusions: Although both HDL-P and HDL-C are parameters of HDL, they have different associations with alcohol, smoking and BMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2557-2565
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume82
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

HDL Lipoproteins
HDL Cholesterol
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Alcohols
Particle Size
Life Style
Coronary Artery Disease
Dyslipidemias
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Lipids

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Body mass index
  • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • High-density lipoprotein particle
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Associations of high-density lipoprotein particle and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with alcohol intake, smoking, and body mass index : The INTERLIPID study. / INTERLIPID and INTERMAP Research Groups.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 82, No. 10, 01.01.2018, p. 2557-2565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0fa9655044984799ada7b4c30b713a03,
title = "Associations of high-density lipoprotein particle and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with alcohol intake, smoking, and body mass index: The INTERLIPID study",
abstract = "Background: Recently, high-density lipoprotein particles (HDL-P) have been found to be more strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk than their counterpart, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Given that lifestyle is among the first targets in CAD prevention, we compared the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with selected lifestyle factors. Methods and Results: We examined 789 Japanese participants of the INTERLIPID Study: men (n=386) and women (n=403) aged 40–59 years in 1996–1998. Participants treated for dyslipidemias were excluded. Lifestyle factors included alcohol intake, smoking amount, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable linear regression was used for cross-sectional analyses of these factors with HDL-P, HDL-C, HDL-P size subclasses (small, medium and large) and mean HDL-P size. In men, higher alcohol intake was associated with higher HDL-P and higher HDL-C. The associations of alcohol, however, were strongest with HDL-P. A higher smoking amount tended to be associated with lower HDL-P and HDL-C. In contrast, BMI was not associated with HDL-P, but was strongly inversely associated with HDL-C. While alcohol intake favored larger mean HDL-P size, smoking and BMI favored a lipid profile with smaller HDL-P subclasses and overall smaller mean HDL-P size. Similar, but generally weaker results were observed in women. Conclusions: Although both HDL-P and HDL-C are parameters of HDL, they have different associations with alcohol, smoking and BMI.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Body mass index, High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, High-density lipoprotein particle, Smoking",
author = "{INTERLIPID and INTERMAP Research Groups} and Maryam Zaid and Katsuyuki Miura and Akira Okayama and Hideaki Nakagawa and Kiyomi Sakata and Shigeyuki Saitoh and Nagako Okuda and Katsushi Yoshita and Choudhury, {Sohel R.} and Beatriz Rodriguez and Kamal Masaki and Bradley Willcox and Naoko Miyagawa and Tomonori Okamura and Queenie Chan and Paul Elliott and Jeremiah Stamler and Hirotsugu Ueshima",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1253/circj.CJ-18-0341",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "2557--2565",
journal = "Circulation Journal",
issn = "1346-9843",
publisher = "Japanese Circulation Society",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of high-density lipoprotein particle and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with alcohol intake, smoking, and body mass index

T2 - The INTERLIPID study

AU - INTERLIPID and INTERMAP Research Groups

AU - Zaid, Maryam

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Nakagawa, Hideaki

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Saitoh, Shigeyuki

AU - Okuda, Nagako

AU - Yoshita, Katsushi

AU - Choudhury, Sohel R.

AU - Rodriguez, Beatriz

AU - Masaki, Kamal

AU - Willcox, Bradley

AU - Miyagawa, Naoko

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Chan, Queenie

AU - Elliott, Paul

AU - Stamler, Jeremiah

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Recently, high-density lipoprotein particles (HDL-P) have been found to be more strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk than their counterpart, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Given that lifestyle is among the first targets in CAD prevention, we compared the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with selected lifestyle factors. Methods and Results: We examined 789 Japanese participants of the INTERLIPID Study: men (n=386) and women (n=403) aged 40–59 years in 1996–1998. Participants treated for dyslipidemias were excluded. Lifestyle factors included alcohol intake, smoking amount, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable linear regression was used for cross-sectional analyses of these factors with HDL-P, HDL-C, HDL-P size subclasses (small, medium and large) and mean HDL-P size. In men, higher alcohol intake was associated with higher HDL-P and higher HDL-C. The associations of alcohol, however, were strongest with HDL-P. A higher smoking amount tended to be associated with lower HDL-P and HDL-C. In contrast, BMI was not associated with HDL-P, but was strongly inversely associated with HDL-C. While alcohol intake favored larger mean HDL-P size, smoking and BMI favored a lipid profile with smaller HDL-P subclasses and overall smaller mean HDL-P size. Similar, but generally weaker results were observed in women. Conclusions: Although both HDL-P and HDL-C are parameters of HDL, they have different associations with alcohol, smoking and BMI.

AB - Background: Recently, high-density lipoprotein particles (HDL-P) have been found to be more strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk than their counterpart, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Given that lifestyle is among the first targets in CAD prevention, we compared the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with selected lifestyle factors. Methods and Results: We examined 789 Japanese participants of the INTERLIPID Study: men (n=386) and women (n=403) aged 40–59 years in 1996–1998. Participants treated for dyslipidemias were excluded. Lifestyle factors included alcohol intake, smoking amount, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable linear regression was used for cross-sectional analyses of these factors with HDL-P, HDL-C, HDL-P size subclasses (small, medium and large) and mean HDL-P size. In men, higher alcohol intake was associated with higher HDL-P and higher HDL-C. The associations of alcohol, however, were strongest with HDL-P. A higher smoking amount tended to be associated with lower HDL-P and HDL-C. In contrast, BMI was not associated with HDL-P, but was strongly inversely associated with HDL-C. While alcohol intake favored larger mean HDL-P size, smoking and BMI favored a lipid profile with smaller HDL-P subclasses and overall smaller mean HDL-P size. Similar, but generally weaker results were observed in women. Conclusions: Although both HDL-P and HDL-C are parameters of HDL, they have different associations with alcohol, smoking and BMI.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Body mass index

KW - High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

KW - High-density lipoprotein particle

KW - Smoking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054058251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054058251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1253/circj.CJ-18-0341

DO - 10.1253/circj.CJ-18-0341

M3 - Article

C2 - 30135319

AN - SCOPUS:85054058251

VL - 82

SP - 2557

EP - 2565

JO - Circulation Journal

JF - Circulation Journal

SN - 1346-9843

IS - 10

ER -