Asymmetric formation and possible function of the primary pore canal in plutei of Temnopleurus hardwicki

Yoshinobu Hara, Ritsu Kuraishi, Isao Uemura, Hideki Katow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development and possible function of the primary pore canal (PPC) in plutei of the sea urchin Temnopleurus hardwicki was examined by immunochemistry, electron microscopy and microsurgery. Left and right PPC that extended from coelomic sacs in plutei contained a bundle of cilia with a 9 + 2 structure that was initially detected as a group of anti-acetylated tubulin antibody-binding granules in the epithelium of coelomic sacs in 28 h postfertilization (PF) prism larvae. The granules extended to be a bundle of fibers toward the larval dorsal surface, concurrent with formation of the PPC on both sides, over the next 4 h. The cilia in both PPC beat actively. However, the PPC on the right side disappeared by approximately 55 h PF, establishing left-right asymmetry by 60 h PF (the four-arm pluteus stage). The numbers of cilia in the left and right PPC in 56 h PF plutei were five and eight, respectively. Microsurgical removal of the coelomic sac from both sides or the left side only from 26 h PF prism larvae decreased body width to 64 and 91% of normal width by 50 h PF pluteus stage, respectively, whereas that of the right PPC did not. These observations suggest that PPC contribute to the maintenance of normal body width, and that there is asymmetrical activity between the left and right PPC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-308
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopment Growth and Differentiation
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Asymmetry
  • Coelomic sac
  • Pluteus
  • Primary pore canal
  • Sea urchin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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