Attitudes Toward Electroconvulsive Therapy among Involuntary and Voluntary Patients

Akihiro Takamiya, Kyosuke Sawada, Masaru Mimura, Taishiro Kishimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective We aimed to examine attitudes toward electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) among involuntary patients, voluntary patients, and their relatives. Methods Patients experiencing a major depressive episode and receiving ECT and their relatives were recruited for the survey. Patients and their relatives answered the self-rating questionnaires with a 7-point Likert scale. We explored differences in the survey results between involuntary and voluntary patients, as well as differences in the survey results between patients and their relatives. Results We recruited 97 participants (53 patients and 44 relatives) for the survey. Approximately 80% of the patients showed positive attitudes toward ECT. There were no statistically significant differences between involuntary (n = 23) and voluntary (n = 30) patients across multiple aspects of the ECT experience, including treatment satisfaction, positive or adverse effects of ECT, and treatment preference in the future. Relatives were more satisfied with the positive effects of ECT and with the information offered before ECT treatment than the patients themselves. Conclusions Approximately 80% of the patients showed overall satisfaction with ECT irrespective of consent status. Relatives were more satisfied with ECT than patients. Electroconvulsive therapy can be a lifesaving treatment for severely depressed patients, and the subjective experience of involuntary patients should be taken into consideration when discussing involuntary ECT treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-169
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of ECT
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Sep 1

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Electroconvulsive Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • depression
  • electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)
  • involuntary
  • survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Attitudes Toward Electroconvulsive Therapy among Involuntary and Voluntary Patients. / Takamiya, Akihiro; Sawada, Kyosuke; Mimura, Masaru; Kishimoto, Taishiro.

In: Journal of ECT, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 165-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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