Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance

Adam M. Corrigan, Roshan L. Shrestha, Ihsan Zulkipli, Noriko Hiroi, Yingjun Liu, Naoka Tamura, Bing Yang, Jessica Patel, Akira Funahashi, Athene Donald, Viji M. Draviam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spindle orientation defines the plane of cell division and, thereby, the spatial position of all daughter cells. Here, we develop a live cell microscopy-based methodology to extract spindle movements in human epithelial cell lines and study how spindles are brought to a pre-defined orientation. We show that spindles undergo two distinct regimes of movements. Spindles are first actively rotated toward the cells' long-axis and then maintained along this pre-defined axis. By quantifying spindle movements in cells depleted of LGN, we show that the first regime of rotational movements requires LGN that recruits cortical dynein. In contrast, the second regime of movements that maintains spindle orientation does not require LGN, but is sensitive to 2ME2 that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Our study sheds first insight into spatially defined spindle movement regimes in human cells, and supports the presence of LGN and dynein independent cortical anchors for astral microtubules.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2643-2655
Number of pages13
JournalCell Cycle
Volume12
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug 15

Fingerprint

Spindle Poles
Spindle Apparatus
Maintenance
Dyneins
Microtubules
Cell Division
Cell Movement
Microscopy
Epithelial Cells
Cell Line

Keywords

  • Microtubule
  • Mitosis
  • Spindle orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Corrigan, A. M., Shrestha, R. L., Zulkipli, I., Hiroi, N., Liu, Y., Tamura, N., ... Draviam, V. M. (2013). Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance. Cell Cycle, 12(16), 2643-2655. https://doi.org/10.4161/cc.25671

Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance. / Corrigan, Adam M.; Shrestha, Roshan L.; Zulkipli, Ihsan; Hiroi, Noriko; Liu, Yingjun; Tamura, Naoka; Yang, Bing; Patel, Jessica; Funahashi, Akira; Donald, Athene; Draviam, Viji M.

In: Cell Cycle, Vol. 12, No. 16, 15.08.2013, p. 2643-2655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corrigan, AM, Shrestha, RL, Zulkipli, I, Hiroi, N, Liu, Y, Tamura, N, Yang, B, Patel, J, Funahashi, A, Donald, A & Draviam, VM 2013, 'Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance', Cell Cycle, vol. 12, no. 16, pp. 2643-2655. https://doi.org/10.4161/cc.25671
Corrigan, Adam M. ; Shrestha, Roshan L. ; Zulkipli, Ihsan ; Hiroi, Noriko ; Liu, Yingjun ; Tamura, Naoka ; Yang, Bing ; Patel, Jessica ; Funahashi, Akira ; Donald, Athene ; Draviam, Viji M. / Automated tracking of mitotic spindle pole positions shows that LGN is required for spindle rotation but not orientation maintenance. In: Cell Cycle. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. 16. pp. 2643-2655.
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