Barrier function and cytologic features of the ocular surface epithelium after autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation

Yoshiyuki Satake, Murat Dogru, Gen Yuki Yamane, Shigeru Kinoshita, Kazuo Tsubota, Jun Shimazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the barrier function and cytologic features of ocular surface epithelium after autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation in a prospective observational study. Methods: The status of the epithelium in 4 eyes with limbal stem cell deficiency was studied preoperatively and postoperatively. We used an impression method to determine the cytologic features and anterior fluorophotometry to determine barrier function. Results: Impression cytology showed nonkeratinized, squamous, polygonal, cohesive cells with a low nuclear to cytoplasmic cell ratio and no goblet cells, corresponding to cultivated oral mucosal epithelium, at up to 16 months after surgery. In some cases, the epithelium displayed a mixture of oral mucosal and conjunctival epithelium, especially in cases with a longer postoperative period. Central epithelial permeability remained persistently high throughout the follow-up period, regardless of the epithelial phenotype. Conclusions: Cultivated oral mucosal epithelial cells were observed to survive for more than 1 year after transplantation, with gradual replacement by conjunctival epithelium in some cases. Decreased barrier function of the transplanted epithelium may have prognostic implications, suggesting the presence of oral mucosal epithelium long after surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume126
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan

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Epithelium
Transplantation
Fluorophotometry
Goblet Cells
Postoperative Period
Observational Studies
Cell Biology
Permeability
Stem Cells
Epithelial Cells
Prospective Studies
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Barrier function and cytologic features of the ocular surface epithelium after autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation. / Satake, Yoshiyuki; Dogru, Murat; Yamane, Gen Yuki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 126, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 23-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satake, Yoshiyuki ; Dogru, Murat ; Yamane, Gen Yuki ; Kinoshita, Shigeru ; Tsubota, Kazuo ; Shimazaki, Jun. / Barrier function and cytologic features of the ocular surface epithelium after autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 2008 ; Vol. 126, No. 1. pp. 23-28.
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