Biconvex posterior chamber accommodating intraocular lens implantation after cataract surgery: Long-term outcomes

Megumi Saiki, Kazuno Negishi, Murat Dogru, Takefumi Yamaguchi, Kazuo Tsubota

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of a biconvex accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) to restore near visual performance. Setting: Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Methods: This 4-year study comprised eyes that had cataract surgery with implantation of a 1CU accommodating IOL. At all postoperative visits, the following were assessed: subjective spherical equivalent (SE) refraction; uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities; uncorrected (UNVA), distance-corrected (DCNVA), and corrected (CNVA) near visual acuities; change in minimum additional (add) power (diopters) to attain CNVA; and accommodation amplitude. A questionnaire was administered at the last visit. Results: Twelve eyes of 8 cataract patients (mean age 59.0 years ± 18.4 [SD]) were evaluated. Postoperatively, the mean SE at 1 year and 4 years was significantly more hyperopic than at 1 month (P<.05). The mean UDVA increased significantly at 4 years compared with 1 month (P<.05). There were no significant changes in CDVA, UNVA, CNVA, and DCNVA throughout the follow-up period. The change in the minimum add power to attain CNVA and in the subjective and objective accommodation amplitudes also did not change significantly over time. Eighty-three percent of patients reported being satisfied with the results. Conclusion: Four years after implantation of an accommodating IOL, most patients had good vision and were satisfied, although the accommodation amplitude for near vision was not sufficient throughout the follow-up. Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-608
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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