Biliary atresia and pregnancy: Puberty may be an important point for predicting the outcome

Tatsuo Kuroda, Morihiro Saeki, Nobuyuki Morikawa, Yasushi Fuchimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to study the late clinical features of biliary atresia in relation to pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Of the 175 patients with biliary atresia operated on at our department, the data for 49 patients (18 males, 31 females) older than 15 years were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Six patients delivered 7 newborns (5 with their native liver and 1 with a transplanted liver). Although one of the patients delivered twice after transplantation, another underwent transplantation after delivery. None of the 7 newborns showed any congenital anomalies; however, 6 were small-for-date newborns. Their birth weight tended to be inversely related to the mothers' age at delivery. An additional 13 patients required liver transplantation, of whom 1 died after transplantation and 1 died before transplantation. The remaining 30 patients showed uneventful courses without transplantation. The age at Kasai operation was significantly higher in the 5 patients who delivered babies with their native liver compared with that in these 30 patients (88.0 vs 68.6 days). A significant difference between these 5 patients and those who died or required transplantation before pregnancy was recognized even at the age of puberty in the alanine aminotransferase (36.5 ± 26.5 vs 126.4 ± 56.1 IU/L), aspartate aminotransferase (36.2 ± 26.5 vs 114.2 ± 48.9 IU/L), and choline esterase (249.7 ± 64.8 vs 163.5 ± 40.2 IU/L). Conclusions: The age at Kasai operation may not necessarily impact the late clinical course; however, liver function at puberty may predict the subsequent clinical course, including the safety of pregnancy. The management strategies should be revised after puberty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1852-1855
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biliary Atresia
Puberty
Pregnancy
Transplantation
Liver
Newborn Infant
Esterases
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Choline
Alanine Transaminase
Birth Weight
Aspartic Acid
Liver Transplantation
Mothers
Safety

Keywords

  • Biliary atresia
  • Delivery
  • Kasai operation
  • Pregnancy
  • Puberty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Biliary atresia and pregnancy : Puberty may be an important point for predicting the outcome. / Kuroda, Tatsuo; Saeki, Morihiro; Morikawa, Nobuyuki; Fuchimoto, Yasushi.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 40, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1852-1855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuroda, Tatsuo ; Saeki, Morihiro ; Morikawa, Nobuyuki ; Fuchimoto, Yasushi. / Biliary atresia and pregnancy : Puberty may be an important point for predicting the outcome. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. 12. pp. 1852-1855.
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