Brain-computer interface in stroke

A review of progress

Stefano Silvoni, Ander Ramos-Murguialday, Marianna Cavinato, Chiara Volpato, Giulia Cisotto, Andrea Turolla, Francesco Piccione, Niels Birbaumer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology has been used for rehabilitation after stroke and there are a number of reports involving stroke patients in BCI-feedback training. Most publications have demonstrated the efficacy of BCI technology in post-stroke rehabilitation using output devices such as Functional Electrical Stimulation, robot, and orthosis. The aim of this review is to focus on the progress of BCI-based rehabilitation strategies and to underline future challenges. A brief history of clinical BCI-approaches is presented focusing on stroke motor rehabilitation. A context for three approaches of a BCI-based motor rehabilitation program is outlined: the substitutive strategy, classical conditioning and operant conditioning. Furthermore, we include an overview of a pilot study concerning a new neuro-forcefeedback strategy. This pilot study involved healthy participants. Finally we address some challenges for future BCI-based rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-252
Number of pages8
JournalClinical EEG and Neuroscience
Volume42
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Oct

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Stroke
Rehabilitation
Technology
Operant Conditioning
Orthotic Devices
Classical Conditioning
Electric Stimulation
Publications
Healthy Volunteers
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Brain-computer interface
  • Brain-machine interface
  • Neuro-forcefeedback
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Progress
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Silvoni, S., Ramos-Murguialday, A., Cavinato, M., Volpato, C., Cisotto, G., Turolla, A., ... Birbaumer, N. (2011). Brain-computer interface in stroke: A review of progress. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 42(4), 245-252.

Brain-computer interface in stroke : A review of progress. / Silvoni, Stefano; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Cavinato, Marianna; Volpato, Chiara; Cisotto, Giulia; Turolla, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Birbaumer, Niels.

In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, Vol. 42, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 245-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silvoni, S, Ramos-Murguialday, A, Cavinato, M, Volpato, C, Cisotto, G, Turolla, A, Piccione, F & Birbaumer, N 2011, 'Brain-computer interface in stroke: A review of progress', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 245-252.
Silvoni S, Ramos-Murguialday A, Cavinato M, Volpato C, Cisotto G, Turolla A et al. Brain-computer interface in stroke: A review of progress. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 2011 Oct;42(4):245-252.
Silvoni, Stefano ; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander ; Cavinato, Marianna ; Volpato, Chiara ; Cisotto, Giulia ; Turolla, Andrea ; Piccione, Francesco ; Birbaumer, Niels. / Brain-computer interface in stroke : A review of progress. In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 245-252.
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