Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan

Kazuo Tamura, Keisuke Aiba, Toshiaki Saeki, Yoichi Nakanishi, Toshiharu Kamura, Hideo Baba, Kazuhiro Yoshida, Nobuyuki Yamamoto, Yuukou Kitagawa, Yoshihiko Maehara, Mototsugu Shimokawa, Koichi Hirata, Masaki Kitajima, Cinv Study Group Of Japan The Cinv Study Group Of Japan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We conducted a nationwide survey on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in Japan and demonstrated good compliance with Japanese CINV guidelines, resulting in good control of vomiting. However, almost half the patients experienced breakthrough CINV. We analyzed the survey results in relationship to the management of patients with breakthrough CINV. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study analyzed data for 1910 patients in Japan scheduled for moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC and HEC, respectively). Patients who developed CINV despite prophylactic use of antiemetics were administered rescue drugs. Patients who received cisplatin-based HEC (C-HEC), non-cisplatin-based HEC (N-HEC), or MEC were evaluated separately. Results: A total of 989 patients experienced CINV, of whom 412 (44%) received rescue antiemetics during the study period. The rate at which patients with breakthrough CINV were started on rescue drugs ranged from 13% to 24%. Rescue drugs were given more frequently on days 2–4 for C-HEC and MEC and on days 1–2 for N-HEC. Eighty-six percent of patients received metoclopramide or domperidone. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs were used for 11–5% of patients. The mean duration of antiemetic use was 2.6 days. Conclusions: Fewer than half of the patients with breakthrough CINV were treated with rescue antiemetics, suggesting that CINV was mild in the remaining patients. However, CINV was sufficiently severe to prevent eating in other patients, indicating the need for new drugs with different mechanisms to control CINV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Oncology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Nausea
Vomiting
Japan
Drug Therapy
Antiemetics
Drug Repositioning
Cisplatin
Surveys and Questionnaires
Domperidone
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Metoclopramide
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Antipsychotic Agents
Observational Studies
Eating
Prospective Studies
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Antiemetic
  • Breakthrough
  • Chemotherapy
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Tamura, K., Aiba, K., Saeki, T., Nakanishi, Y., Kamura, T., Baba, H., ... The Cinv Study Group Of Japan, C. S. G. O. J. (Accepted/In press). Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan. International Journal of Clinical Oncology, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10147-016-1069-7

Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting : report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan. / Tamura, Kazuo; Aiba, Keisuke; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Kamura, Toshiharu; Baba, Hideo; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yuukou; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Hirata, Koichi; Kitajima, Masaki; The Cinv Study Group Of Japan, Cinv Study Group Of Japan.

In: International Journal of Clinical Oncology, 01.12.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamura, K, Aiba, K, Saeki, T, Nakanishi, Y, Kamura, T, Baba, H, Yoshida, K, Yamamoto, N, Kitagawa, Y, Maehara, Y, Shimokawa, M, Hirata, K, Kitajima, M & The Cinv Study Group Of Japan, CSGOJ 2016, 'Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan', International Journal of Clinical Oncology, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10147-016-1069-7
Tamura, Kazuo ; Aiba, Keisuke ; Saeki, Toshiaki ; Nakanishi, Yoichi ; Kamura, Toshiharu ; Baba, Hideo ; Yoshida, Kazuhiro ; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki ; Kitagawa, Yuukou ; Maehara, Yoshihiko ; Shimokawa, Mototsugu ; Hirata, Koichi ; Kitajima, Masaki ; The Cinv Study Group Of Japan, Cinv Study Group Of Japan. / Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting : report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan. In: International Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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abstract = "Background: We conducted a nationwide survey on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in Japan and demonstrated good compliance with Japanese CINV guidelines, resulting in good control of vomiting. However, almost half the patients experienced breakthrough CINV. We analyzed the survey results in relationship to the management of patients with breakthrough CINV. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study analyzed data for 1910 patients in Japan scheduled for moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC and HEC, respectively). Patients who developed CINV despite prophylactic use of antiemetics were administered rescue drugs. Patients who received cisplatin-based HEC (C-HEC), non-cisplatin-based HEC (N-HEC), or MEC were evaluated separately. Results: A total of 989 patients experienced CINV, of whom 412 (44{\%}) received rescue antiemetics during the study period. The rate at which patients with breakthrough CINV were started on rescue drugs ranged from 13{\%} to 24{\%}. Rescue drugs were given more frequently on days 2–4 for C-HEC and MEC and on days 1–2 for N-HEC. Eighty-six percent of patients received metoclopramide or domperidone. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs were used for 11–5{\%} of patients. The mean duration of antiemetic use was 2.6 days. Conclusions: Fewer than half of the patients with breakthrough CINV were treated with rescue antiemetics, suggesting that CINV was mild in the remaining patients. However, CINV was sufficiently severe to prevent eating in other patients, indicating the need for new drugs with different mechanisms to control CINV.",
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T1 - Breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

T2 - report of a nationwide survey by the CINV Study Group of Japan

AU - Tamura, Kazuo

AU - Aiba, Keisuke

AU - Saeki, Toshiaki

AU - Nakanishi, Yoichi

AU - Kamura, Toshiharu

AU - Baba, Hideo

AU - Yoshida, Kazuhiro

AU - Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

AU - Kitagawa, Yuukou

AU - Maehara, Yoshihiko

AU - Shimokawa, Mototsugu

AU - Hirata, Koichi

AU - Kitajima, Masaki

AU - The Cinv Study Group Of Japan, Cinv Study Group Of Japan

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Background: We conducted a nationwide survey on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in Japan and demonstrated good compliance with Japanese CINV guidelines, resulting in good control of vomiting. However, almost half the patients experienced breakthrough CINV. We analyzed the survey results in relationship to the management of patients with breakthrough CINV. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study analyzed data for 1910 patients in Japan scheduled for moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC and HEC, respectively). Patients who developed CINV despite prophylactic use of antiemetics were administered rescue drugs. Patients who received cisplatin-based HEC (C-HEC), non-cisplatin-based HEC (N-HEC), or MEC were evaluated separately. Results: A total of 989 patients experienced CINV, of whom 412 (44%) received rescue antiemetics during the study period. The rate at which patients with breakthrough CINV were started on rescue drugs ranged from 13% to 24%. Rescue drugs were given more frequently on days 2–4 for C-HEC and MEC and on days 1–2 for N-HEC. Eighty-six percent of patients received metoclopramide or domperidone. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs were used for 11–5% of patients. The mean duration of antiemetic use was 2.6 days. Conclusions: Fewer than half of the patients with breakthrough CINV were treated with rescue antiemetics, suggesting that CINV was mild in the remaining patients. However, CINV was sufficiently severe to prevent eating in other patients, indicating the need for new drugs with different mechanisms to control CINV.

AB - Background: We conducted a nationwide survey on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in Japan and demonstrated good compliance with Japanese CINV guidelines, resulting in good control of vomiting. However, almost half the patients experienced breakthrough CINV. We analyzed the survey results in relationship to the management of patients with breakthrough CINV. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study analyzed data for 1910 patients in Japan scheduled for moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC and HEC, respectively). Patients who developed CINV despite prophylactic use of antiemetics were administered rescue drugs. Patients who received cisplatin-based HEC (C-HEC), non-cisplatin-based HEC (N-HEC), or MEC were evaluated separately. Results: A total of 989 patients experienced CINV, of whom 412 (44%) received rescue antiemetics during the study period. The rate at which patients with breakthrough CINV were started on rescue drugs ranged from 13% to 24%. Rescue drugs were given more frequently on days 2–4 for C-HEC and MEC and on days 1–2 for N-HEC. Eighty-six percent of patients received metoclopramide or domperidone. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs were used for 11–5% of patients. The mean duration of antiemetic use was 2.6 days. Conclusions: Fewer than half of the patients with breakthrough CINV were treated with rescue antiemetics, suggesting that CINV was mild in the remaining patients. However, CINV was sufficiently severe to prevent eating in other patients, indicating the need for new drugs with different mechanisms to control CINV.

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KW - Breakthrough

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Nausea

KW - Vomiting

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