Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) induces cellular resistance to HIV-1 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

Xin Wang, Tatsuhiko Furukawa, Takao Nitanda, Mika Okamoto, Yoshikazu Sugimoto, Shin Ichi Akiyama, Masanori Baba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a novel member of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which induce multidrug resistance in cancer cells. We found that a high level of BCRP expression in CD4+ T cells conferred cellular resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The cell line MT-4/DOX500 was established through the long-term culture of MT-4 cells in the presence of doxorubicin (DOX) and had reduced sensitivity to not only DOX but also zidovudine (AZT). MT-4/DOX500 cells showed reduced intracellular accumulation and retention of DOX and increased ATP-dependent rhodamine 123 efflux. The cells were also resistant to several anticancer agents such as mitoxantrone, 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino]carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin. AZT was 7.5-fold less inhibitory to HIV-1 replication in MT-4/DOX500 cells than in MT-4 cells. Furthermore, the anti-HIV-1 activity of lamivudine was severely impaired in MT-4/DOX500 cells. In contrast, the antiviral activity of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors was not affected in the cells. MT-4/DOX500 cells expressed glycosylated BCRP but not P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein 1, 2, or 4 (ABCC1, -2, or -4), or lung resistance-related protein. In addition, the BCRP-specific inhibitor fumitremorgin C completely abolished the resistance of MT-4/DOX500 cells to AZT as well as to DOX. An analysis for intracellular metabolism of AZT suggests that the resistance is attributed to the increase of ATP-dependent efflux of its metabolites, presumably AZT 5′-monophosphate, in MT-4/DOX500 cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Pharmacology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Nucleosides
HIV-1
Breast Neoplasms
Doxorubicin
irinotecan
P-Glycoprotein
Human immunodeficiency virus 1 reverse transcriptase
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Sub-Family G, Member 2
Adenosine Triphosphate
Rhodamine 123
Mitoxantrone
Lamivudine
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters
Zidovudine
Multiple Drug Resistance
Virus Replication
Protease Inhibitors
Antineoplastic Agents
Antiviral Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) induces cellular resistance to HIV-1 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. / Wang, Xin; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Nitanda, Takao; Okamoto, Mika; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Akiyama, Shin Ichi; Baba, Masanori.

In: Molecular Pharmacology, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 65-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Xin ; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko ; Nitanda, Takao ; Okamoto, Mika ; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu ; Akiyama, Shin Ichi ; Baba, Masanori. / Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) induces cellular resistance to HIV-1 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. In: Molecular Pharmacology. 2003 ; Vol. 63, No. 1. pp. 65-72.
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