Can Sleep Enhance both Implicit and Explicit Processes?

Andrea C. Smyth, Shuichiro Taya, Chris Hope, Magda Osman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This experiment examined the effects of sleep on learning, while employing an experimental design that minimizes time of day and fatigue effects. Using a modified two-phase contextual cuing task, we show that sleep benefits consolidation and offline learning minimally, and hindered subsequent conscious awareness on an explicit memory test. These differential effects of sleep on implicit learning and explicit memory can be taken as evidence that these types of information are processed differently and based on entirely distinct memory stores.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationExpanding the Space of Cognitive Science - Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2011
EditorsLaura Carlson, Christoph Hoelscher, Thomas F. Shipley
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages2329-2334
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780976831877
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Expanding the Space of Cognitive Science, CogSci 2011 - Boston, United States
Duration: 2011 Jul 202011 Jul 23

Publication series

NameExpanding the Space of Cognitive Science - Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2011

Conference

Conference33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Expanding the Space of Cognitive Science, CogSci 2011
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston
Period11/7/2011/7/23

Keywords

  • Contextual cuing
  • offline learning
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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