Cancer epigenetics

Modifications, screening, and therapy

Einav Nili Gal-Yam, Yoshimasa Saito, Gerda Egger, Peter A. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deregulation of gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Although genetic lesions have been the focus of cancer research for many years, it has become increasingly recognized that aberrant epigenetic modifications also play major roles in the tumorigenic process. These modifications are imposed on chromatin, do not change the nucleotide sequence of DNA, and are manifested by specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through many cell divisions. We review these modifications in normal and cancer cells and the evolving approaches used to study them. Additionally, we outline advances in their potential use for cancer diagnostics and targeted epigenetic therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-280
Number of pages14
JournalAnnual Review of Medicine
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epigenomics
Gene expression
Screening
Cells
Deregulation
Chromatin
Neoplasms
Nucleotides
Gene Expression
DNA
Therapeutics
Cell Division
Research

Keywords

  • CpG islands
  • DNA methylation
  • Histone modification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cancer epigenetics : Modifications, screening, and therapy. / Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Saito, Yoshimasa; Egger, Gerda; Jones, Peter A.

In: Annual Review of Medicine, Vol. 59, 2008, p. 267-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gal-Yam, Einav Nili ; Saito, Yoshimasa ; Egger, Gerda ; Jones, Peter A. / Cancer epigenetics : Modifications, screening, and therapy. In: Annual Review of Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 59. pp. 267-280.
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