Cardiac output and active limb blood flow responses to unilateral and bilateral dynamic handgrip exercise

Shizuyo Shimizu-Okuyama, Sachiko Homma, Atsuko Kagaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purposes of this study were 1) to determine cardiac output and active limb blood flow responses to unilateral and bilateral dynamic handgrip exercises and 2) to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and a change in active muscle mass on the relationship between limb blood flow and cardiac output. Five physically active women performed dynamic handgrip exercises with the right hand (right handgrip exercise ; RHG), with the left hand (left handgrip exercise ; LHG), and bilaterally (bilateral handgrip exercise ; BHG). Exercise intensities were 10%, 30% and 50% of the subjects' maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and the exercise frequency was 60 contractions per minute. The 10%MVC exercise duration was 10 min, while the 30% and 50%MVC exercise conditions were performed to exhaustion. During exercise, stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) were measured using Doppler ultrasound and electrocardiogram (ECG), respectively. Cardiac output (Q̇ sys) was calculated as the product of SV and HR. Blood flow to the forearm (Q̇ forearm) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Q̇ sys did not differ significantly between RHG, LHG and BHG. However, SV was lower in BHG than in RHG and LHG. Reciprocally, HR was higher during BHG than RHG and LHG. The increase in the Q̇ forearm was significantly lower during BHG than RHG and LHG exercise (p<0.05). These results suggest that Q̇ sys does not differ between unilateral and bilateral handgrip exercise, despite the increase in active muscle mass. The unchanged Q̇ sys could be explained by the Q̇ forearm reduction during BHG. The Q̇ forearm was lower during BHG than during the unilateral hand-grip exercises, possibly due to vasoconstriction induced by BHG exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)633-642
Number of pages10
JournalJapanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine
Volume50
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Oct
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiac Output
Extremities
Exercise
Forearm
Stroke Volume
Hand
Heart Rate
Doppler Ultrasonography
Muscles
Plethysmography
Hand Strength
Vasoconstriction
Electrocardiography

Keywords

  • Doppler ultrasound
  • Heart rate
  • Muscle mass
  • Stroke volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Cardiac output and active limb blood flow responses to unilateral and bilateral dynamic handgrip exercise. / Shimizu-Okuyama, Shizuyo; Homma, Sachiko; Kagaya, Atsuko.

In: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 5, 10.2001, p. 633-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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