Carotid plaque score and risk of cardiovascular mortality in the oldest old: Results from the TOOTH study

Takumi Hirata, Yasumichi Arai, Michiyo Takayama, Yukiko Abe, Kiyoshi Ohkuma, Toru Takebayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Accumulating evidence suggests that predictability of traditional cardiovascular risk factors declines with advancing age. We investigated whether carotid plaque scores (CPSs) were associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) death in the oldest old, and whether asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), a marker of endothelial dysfunction, moderated the association between the CPS and CVD death. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese subjects aged ≥85 years without CVD at baseline. We followed this cohort for 6 years to investigate the association of CPS with CVD death via multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis. We divided participants into three groups according to CPS (no, 0 points; low, 1.2–4.9 points; high, ≥5.0 points). The predictive value of CPS for estimating CVD death risk over CVD risk factors, including ADMA, was examined using C-statistics. Results: We analyzed 347 participants (151 men, 196 women; mean age, 87.6 years), of which 135 (38.9%) had no carotid plaque at baseline, and 48 (13.8%) had high CPS. Of the total, 29 (8.4%) participants experienced CVD-related death during the study period. Multivariable analysis revealed a significant association of high CPS with CVD-related mortality relative to no CPS (hazard ratio, 3.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.47–10.39). ADMA was not associated with CVD death, but the significant association between CPS and CVD death was observed only in lower ADMA level. The addition of CPS to other risk factors improved the predictability of CVD death (p=0.032). Conclusions: High CPS correlated significantly with a higher CVD death risk in the oldest old with low cardiovascular risk. Ultrasound carotid plaque evaluation might facilitate risk evaluations of CVD death in the very old.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Cardiovascular Diseases
Mortality
Hazards
Cohort Studies
Ultrasonics
Statistics
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
dimethylarginine

Keywords

  • Asymmetrical dimethylarginine
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Carotid plaque score
  • Epidemiology
  • Oldest old

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Carotid plaque score and risk of cardiovascular mortality in the oldest old : Results from the TOOTH study. / Hirata, Takumi; Arai, Yasumichi; Takayama, Michiyo; Abe, Yukiko; Ohkuma, Kiyoshi; Takebayashi, Toru.

In: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 55-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Carotid plaque score and risk of cardiovascular mortality in the oldest old: Results from the TOOTH study",
abstract = "Aim: Accumulating evidence suggests that predictability of traditional cardiovascular risk factors declines with advancing age. We investigated whether carotid plaque scores (CPSs) were associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) death in the oldest old, and whether asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), a marker of endothelial dysfunction, moderated the association between the CPS and CVD death. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese subjects aged ≥85 years without CVD at baseline. We followed this cohort for 6 years to investigate the association of CPS with CVD death via multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis. We divided participants into three groups according to CPS (no, 0 points; low, 1.2–4.9 points; high, ≥5.0 points). The predictive value of CPS for estimating CVD death risk over CVD risk factors, including ADMA, was examined using C-statistics. Results: We analyzed 347 participants (151 men, 196 women; mean age, 87.6 years), of which 135 (38.9{\%}) had no carotid plaque at baseline, and 48 (13.8{\%}) had high CPS. Of the total, 29 (8.4{\%}) participants experienced CVD-related death during the study period. Multivariable analysis revealed a significant association of high CPS with CVD-related mortality relative to no CPS (hazard ratio, 3.90; 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.47–10.39). ADMA was not associated with CVD death, but the significant association between CPS and CVD death was observed only in lower ADMA level. The addition of CPS to other risk factors improved the predictability of CVD death (p=0.032). Conclusions: High CPS correlated significantly with a higher CVD death risk in the oldest old with low cardiovascular risk. Ultrasound carotid plaque evaluation might facilitate risk evaluations of CVD death in the very old.",
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T1 - Carotid plaque score and risk of cardiovascular mortality in the oldest old

T2 - Results from the TOOTH study

AU - Hirata, Takumi

AU - Arai, Yasumichi

AU - Takayama, Michiyo

AU - Abe, Yukiko

AU - Ohkuma, Kiyoshi

AU - Takebayashi, Toru

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N2 - Aim: Accumulating evidence suggests that predictability of traditional cardiovascular risk factors declines with advancing age. We investigated whether carotid plaque scores (CPSs) were associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) death in the oldest old, and whether asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), a marker of endothelial dysfunction, moderated the association between the CPS and CVD death. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese subjects aged ≥85 years without CVD at baseline. We followed this cohort for 6 years to investigate the association of CPS with CVD death via multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis. We divided participants into three groups according to CPS (no, 0 points; low, 1.2–4.9 points; high, ≥5.0 points). The predictive value of CPS for estimating CVD death risk over CVD risk factors, including ADMA, was examined using C-statistics. Results: We analyzed 347 participants (151 men, 196 women; mean age, 87.6 years), of which 135 (38.9%) had no carotid plaque at baseline, and 48 (13.8%) had high CPS. Of the total, 29 (8.4%) participants experienced CVD-related death during the study period. Multivariable analysis revealed a significant association of high CPS with CVD-related mortality relative to no CPS (hazard ratio, 3.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.47–10.39). ADMA was not associated with CVD death, but the significant association between CPS and CVD death was observed only in lower ADMA level. The addition of CPS to other risk factors improved the predictability of CVD death (p=0.032). Conclusions: High CPS correlated significantly with a higher CVD death risk in the oldest old with low cardiovascular risk. Ultrasound carotid plaque evaluation might facilitate risk evaluations of CVD death in the very old.

AB - Aim: Accumulating evidence suggests that predictability of traditional cardiovascular risk factors declines with advancing age. We investigated whether carotid plaque scores (CPSs) were associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) death in the oldest old, and whether asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), a marker of endothelial dysfunction, moderated the association between the CPS and CVD death. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese subjects aged ≥85 years without CVD at baseline. We followed this cohort for 6 years to investigate the association of CPS with CVD death via multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis. We divided participants into three groups according to CPS (no, 0 points; low, 1.2–4.9 points; high, ≥5.0 points). The predictive value of CPS for estimating CVD death risk over CVD risk factors, including ADMA, was examined using C-statistics. Results: We analyzed 347 participants (151 men, 196 women; mean age, 87.6 years), of which 135 (38.9%) had no carotid plaque at baseline, and 48 (13.8%) had high CPS. Of the total, 29 (8.4%) participants experienced CVD-related death during the study period. Multivariable analysis revealed a significant association of high CPS with CVD-related mortality relative to no CPS (hazard ratio, 3.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.47–10.39). ADMA was not associated with CVD death, but the significant association between CPS and CVD death was observed only in lower ADMA level. The addition of CPS to other risk factors improved the predictability of CVD death (p=0.032). Conclusions: High CPS correlated significantly with a higher CVD death risk in the oldest old with low cardiovascular risk. Ultrasound carotid plaque evaluation might facilitate risk evaluations of CVD death in the very old.

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