Cell transplantation for spinal cord injury focusing on iPSCs

Masaya Nakamura, Osahiko Tsuji, Satoshi Nori, Yoshiaki Toyama, Hideyuki Okano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Reports of functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) after the transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from fetus/embryonic stem cells (ESCs), has raised great expectations for the successful clinical use of stem cell transplantation therapy. However, the ethical issues involved in destroying human embryos or fertilized oocytes to obtain NSCs have been a major obstacle to developing clinically useful stem cell sources, and the transplantation of stem cells isolated from other human embryonic tissues has not yet been developed for use in clinical applications. Areas covered: Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can serve as a source of cells for autologous transplantation, have been attracting a great deal of attention as a clinically viable alternative to stem cells obtained directly from tissues. In this review, the authors outline the neural induction of ESC/iPSC, their therapeutic efficacy in SCI and their safety in vivo. Expert opinion: Although iPSCs offer great promise as the cell source for autologous transplantation for SCI, safety issues including tumorigenicity should be determined prior to the clinical trial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)811-821
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul

Fingerprint

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Cell Transplantation
Stem cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Neural Stem Cells
Autologous Transplantation
Stem Cell Transplantation
Embryonic Stem Cells
Stem Cells
Safety
Expert Testimony
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Ethics
Oocytes
Fetus
Embryonic Structures
Transplantation
Clinical Trials
Tissue
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Induced pluripotnet stem cell
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Cell transplantation for spinal cord injury focusing on iPSCs. / Nakamura, Masaya; Tsuji, Osahiko; Nori, Satoshi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki.

In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, Vol. 12, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 811-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakamura, Masaya ; Tsuji, Osahiko ; Nori, Satoshi ; Toyama, Yoshiaki ; Okano, Hideyuki. / Cell transplantation for spinal cord injury focusing on iPSCs. In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 811-821.
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