Cellular microfabrication: Observing intercellular interactions using lithographically-defined DNA capture sequences

Hiroaki Onoe, Sonny C. Hsiao, Erik S. Douglas, Zev J. Gartner, Carolyn R. Bertozzi, Matthew B. Francis, Richard A. Mathies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous reports have shown that synthetic DNA strands can be attached to the plasma membrane of living cells to equip them with artificial adhesion "receptors" that bind to complementary strands extending from material surfaces. This approach is compatible with a wide range of cell types, offers excellent capture efficiency, and can potentially be used to create complex multicellular arrangements through the use of multiple capture sequences. In this work, we apply an aluminum "lift off" lithography method to allow the efficient generation of complex patterns comprising different DNA sequences. The resulting surfaces are then demonstrated to be able to capture up to three distinct types of living cells in specific locations. The utility of this approach is demonstrated through the observation of patterned cells as they communicate by diffusion-based paracrine signaling. It is anticipated that the ability of this technique to create virtually any type of 2D heterogeneous cell pattern should prove highly useful for the examination of key questions in cell signaling, including stem cell differentiation and cancer metastasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8120-8126
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume28
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 29
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microfabrication
DNA
deoxyribonucleic acid
Cells
Cell signaling
DNA sequences
Cell membranes
Stem cells
cells
Aluminum
strands
Lithography
Adhesion
interactions
stem cells
metastasis
adhesion
lithography
examination
cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Onoe, H., Hsiao, S. C., Douglas, E. S., Gartner, Z. J., Bertozzi, C. R., Francis, M. B., & Mathies, R. A. (2012). Cellular microfabrication: Observing intercellular interactions using lithographically-defined DNA capture sequences. Langmuir, 28(21), 8120-8126. https://doi.org/10.1021/la204863s

Cellular microfabrication : Observing intercellular interactions using lithographically-defined DNA capture sequences. / Onoe, Hiroaki; Hsiao, Sonny C.; Douglas, Erik S.; Gartner, Zev J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Francis, Matthew B.; Mathies, Richard A.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 28, No. 21, 29.05.2012, p. 8120-8126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Onoe, H, Hsiao, SC, Douglas, ES, Gartner, ZJ, Bertozzi, CR, Francis, MB & Mathies, RA 2012, 'Cellular microfabrication: Observing intercellular interactions using lithographically-defined DNA capture sequences', Langmuir, vol. 28, no. 21, pp. 8120-8126. https://doi.org/10.1021/la204863s
Onoe, Hiroaki ; Hsiao, Sonny C. ; Douglas, Erik S. ; Gartner, Zev J. ; Bertozzi, Carolyn R. ; Francis, Matthew B. ; Mathies, Richard A. / Cellular microfabrication : Observing intercellular interactions using lithographically-defined DNA capture sequences. In: Langmuir. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 21. pp. 8120-8126.
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