Chair rising time is longer in postmenopausal women with history of nonvertebral fracture

J. Iwamoto, Y. Sato, H. Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to clarify the relationships between physical function, bone mass, biochemical markers, renal function, and a history of nonvertebral fracture in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. In total, 143 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age: 71.2 years) and an osteoporosis treatment-naïve status were recruited. Twenty-seven women had a history of nonvertebral fracture (nonvertebral fracture group) and 116 women did not (control group). The patients' bone mass, biochemical markers, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), unipedal standing time (index of body balance), and the five-repetition chair-rising time (index of muscle power) were compared between the two groups. Age, body mass index, bone mass, serum alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, albumin, urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen, eGFR, and the unipedal standing time did not differ significantly between the two groups. However, the chair-rising time was significantly longer (12.3 sec vs. 9.6 sec) in the nonvertebral fracture group than in the control group. The odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for nonvertebral fractures in subjects with a chair-rising time >10.1 sec (mean value) was 4.28 (1.78, 10.30). Thus, a significant association was found between the impairment of muscle power and a history of nonvertebral fracture in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-234
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions
Volume13
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep

Keywords

  • Clinical fracture
  • Fall
  • Hypophosphatemia
  • Muscle power
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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