Changes in weight, cardiovascular risk factors and estimated risk of coronary heart disease following smoking cessation in Japanese male workers: HIPOP-OHP study

Unai Tamura, Taichiro Tanaka, Tomonori Okamura, Takashi Kadowaki, Hiroshi Yamato, Hideo Tanaka, Masakazu Nakamura, Akira Okayama, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Zentaro Yamagata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: It is well established that people gain weight after smoking cessation; however, changes in cardiovascular risk factors and the estimated risk of coronary heart disease following smoking cessation have yet to be fully clarified. Methods: The participants were 1,995 Japanese male workers at 11 workplaces who participated continuously in the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOPOHP) study. Participants with a smoking habit had cardiovascular risk factors measured at baseline and over a 4-yr period. Their estimated incidence risk of coronary heart disease was calculated by a formula based on a previous cohort study. Results: Successful abstainers who had stopped smoking for at least 6 months at the end of the follow-up period had weight gains of approximately 2 kg. These subjects had significant worsening of the following factors compared to continuing smokers: systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride and fasting blood sugar levels. In contrast, HDL-cholesterol levels improved significantly. When the overall instantaneous incidence risk of coronary heart disease prior to smoking cessation was assumed to be 1.00, the estimated risk was 0.76 (95%CI: 0.68-0.85) in successful abstainers due mainly to smoking cessation, despite weight gain. Conclusion: Although smoking cessation leads to weight gain, the estimated risk of coronary heart disease was decreased markedly by smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-20
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Volume17
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Coronary Disease
Weights and Measures
Weight Gain
Smoking
Blood Pressure
Incidence
Occupational Health
Health Promotion
Workplace
HDL Cholesterol
Habits
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Blood pressure
Triglycerides
Cohort Studies
Cholesterol
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cholesterol
  • Lifestyle modification
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Changes in weight, cardiovascular risk factors and estimated risk of coronary heart disease following smoking cessation in Japanese male workers : HIPOP-OHP study. / Tamura, Unai; Tanaka, Taichiro; Okamura, Tomonori; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yamato, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masakazu; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Yamagata, Zentaro.

In: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2010, p. 12-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamura, U, Tanaka, T, Okamura, T, Kadowaki, T, Yamato, H, Tanaka, H, Nakamura, M, Okayama, A, Ueshima, H & Yamagata, Z 2010, 'Changes in weight, cardiovascular risk factors and estimated risk of coronary heart disease following smoking cessation in Japanese male workers: HIPOP-OHP study', Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 12-20.
Tamura, Unai ; Tanaka, Taichiro ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Kadowaki, Takashi ; Yamato, Hiroshi ; Tanaka, Hideo ; Nakamura, Masakazu ; Okayama, Akira ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu ; Yamagata, Zentaro. / Changes in weight, cardiovascular risk factors and estimated risk of coronary heart disease following smoking cessation in Japanese male workers : HIPOP-OHP study. In: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 12-20.
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AU - Kadowaki, Takashi

AU - Yamato, Hiroshi

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