Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing, China

Fengkui Duan, Kebin He, Yongliang Ma, Yingtao Jia, Fumo Yang, Yu Lei, S. Tanaka, T. Okuta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbonaceous aerosols and PM10 were monitored from September 8 to November 30, 2002, in a semi-urban site (Tsinghua University) in Beijing. Daily concentrations of OC and EC ranged from 7.1 to 65.9 μg C m-3 and from 1.3 to 26.1 μg C m-3, with the overall average concentrations of 21.2 μg C m-3 and 7.3 μg C m-3, respectively. The diurnal variation of carbonaceous concentrations on 2 h basis presented two-peak trend, which was attributed to the cooperative effect of local meteorological conditions and anthropogenic sources such as traffic exhaust and human outdoor activities. Daily average OC/EC ratio varied between 1.5 and 5.3 with an average of 3.0. Strong correlation between OC and EC (R 2 = 0.8) indicated that their main sources were common. The frequency of OC/EC ratio presented Gaussian normal distribution trend in fall, of which the peak value appeared in the range of 2.8-5. In winter, it presented bi-peak mode, with the first peak near 1.4-1.6, and the second between 2.8 and 5. The high value (2.8-5) implied the SOC formation in both seasons, and the low one probably suggested the primary OC/EC ratio from coal burning in winter. Averagely, PM10 and carbonaceous species exhibited higher concentrations in Wednesday than in other weekdays, which could be ascribed to the low wind speed (1.6 m s-1) and high humidity (62.9%). OC was the abundant component accounting for 76% of TC. OC and EC contributed 15% and 5% to PM10, respectively. The estimation on a minimum OC/EC ratio (1.5) basis showed that SOC accounted more than 50% for the total organic carbon. Even in winter, the SOC contribution to OC was also significant, as high as 40%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-364
Number of pages10
JournalChemosphere
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jul

Fingerprint

Coal
Normal Distribution
Normal distribution
Organic carbon
Aerosols
China
Atmospheric humidity
aerosol
winter
Humidity
Human Activities
Carbon
urban site
anthropogenic source
diurnal variation
total organic carbon
humidity
wind velocity
coal
Beijing

Keywords

  • Elemental carbon
  • OC/EC ratio
  • Organic carbon
  • PM
  • Secondary organic aerosol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Duan, F., He, K., Ma, Y., Jia, Y., Yang, F., Lei, Y., ... Okuta, T. (2005). Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing, China. Chemosphere, 60(3), 355-364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2004.12.035

Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing, China. / Duan, Fengkui; He, Kebin; Ma, Yongliang; Jia, Yingtao; Yang, Fumo; Lei, Yu; Tanaka, S.; Okuta, T.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 60, No. 3, 07.2005, p. 355-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duan, F, He, K, Ma, Y, Jia, Y, Yang, F, Lei, Y, Tanaka, S & Okuta, T 2005, 'Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing, China', Chemosphere, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 355-364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2004.12.035
Duan, Fengkui ; He, Kebin ; Ma, Yongliang ; Jia, Yingtao ; Yang, Fumo ; Lei, Yu ; Tanaka, S. ; Okuta, T. / Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing, China. In: Chemosphere. 2005 ; Vol. 60, No. 3. pp. 355-364.
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abstract = "Carbonaceous aerosols and PM10 were monitored from September 8 to November 30, 2002, in a semi-urban site (Tsinghua University) in Beijing. Daily concentrations of OC and EC ranged from 7.1 to 65.9 μg C m-3 and from 1.3 to 26.1 μg C m-3, with the overall average concentrations of 21.2 μg C m-3 and 7.3 μg C m-3, respectively. The diurnal variation of carbonaceous concentrations on 2 h basis presented two-peak trend, which was attributed to the cooperative effect of local meteorological conditions and anthropogenic sources such as traffic exhaust and human outdoor activities. Daily average OC/EC ratio varied between 1.5 and 5.3 with an average of 3.0. Strong correlation between OC and EC (R 2 = 0.8) indicated that their main sources were common. The frequency of OC/EC ratio presented Gaussian normal distribution trend in fall, of which the peak value appeared in the range of 2.8-5. In winter, it presented bi-peak mode, with the first peak near 1.4-1.6, and the second between 2.8 and 5. The high value (2.8-5) implied the SOC formation in both seasons, and the low one probably suggested the primary OC/EC ratio from coal burning in winter. Averagely, PM10 and carbonaceous species exhibited higher concentrations in Wednesday than in other weekdays, which could be ascribed to the low wind speed (1.6 m s-1) and high humidity (62.9{\%}). OC was the abundant component accounting for 76{\%} of TC. OC and EC contributed 15{\%} and 5{\%} to PM10, respectively. The estimation on a minimum OC/EC ratio (1.5) basis showed that SOC accounted more than 50{\%} for the total organic carbon. Even in winter, the SOC contribution to OC was also significant, as high as 40{\%}.",
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