Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2007 to 2008

Keisuke Sunakawa, Fuminori Sakai, Yuriko Hirao, Hideaki Hanaki, Masato Nonoyama, Satoshi Iwata, Hironobu Akita, Yoshitake Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We surveyed pediatrics bacterial meningitis epidemiology from January 2007 to December 2008 in Japan, with the following results: Cases numbered 287-160 male and 127 female-equivalent to 1.54-1.62 of 1,000 pediatric hospitalization per year. Children under 1-year-old accounted for the highest number of cases, which decreased with increasing age. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common cause of infection, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae, group B streptococcus (GBS), and Escherichia coli. GBS and E. coli were major pathogens in children under 4 months of age, while H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae mainly accounted for those over 4 months of age. Susceptibility tests showed that 51% of H. influenzae isolates and 56.5% of S. pneumoniae isolates in 2008 were drug-resistant. Ampicillin combined with cephem antibiotics effective against GBS, E. coli, and Listeria, were mainly used to initially treat those under 4 months of age. In those over 4 months of age, carbapenem antibiotics are effective against PRSP and cephem antibiotics against H. influenza.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-41
Number of pages9
JournalKansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases
Volume84
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan
Externally publishedYes

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Bacterial Meningitides
Streptococcus agalactiae
Haemophilus influenzae
Japan
Escherichia coli
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Listeria
Carbapenems
Ampicillin
Streptococcus
Human Influenza
Epidemiology
Hospitalization
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sunakawa, K., Sakai, F., Hirao, Y., Hanaki, H., Nonoyama, M., Iwata, S., ... Sato, Y. (2010). Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2007 to 2008. Kansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, 84(1), 33-41.

Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2007 to 2008. / Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sakai, Fuminori; Hirao, Yuriko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Iwata, Satoshi; Akita, Hironobu; Sato, Yoshitake.

In: Kansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, Vol. 84, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 33-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sunakawa, K, Sakai, F, Hirao, Y, Hanaki, H, Nonoyama, M, Iwata, S, Akita, H & Sato, Y 2010, 'Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2007 to 2008', Kansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 33-41.
Sunakawa, Keisuke ; Sakai, Fuminori ; Hirao, Yuriko ; Hanaki, Hideaki ; Nonoyama, Masato ; Iwata, Satoshi ; Akita, Hironobu ; Sato, Yoshitake. / Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2007 to 2008. In: Kansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 33-41.
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