Clinical aspects of invasive infections with Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis in Japan

Differences with respect to Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae infections

T. Takahashi, K. Sunaoshi, K. Sunakawa, Seitaro Fujishima, H. Watanabe, K. Ubukata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) is increasingly being identified as a pathogen responsible for invasive and non-invasive infections. We compared the clinical features of invasive SDSE infections with those of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus (GAS)) and Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus (GBS)). Active surveillance for invasive SDSE, GAS and GBS was maintained over 1 year at 142 medical institutions throughout Japan. Clinical information was collected together with isolates, which were characterized microbiologically. Two hundred and thirty-one invasive SDSE infections were identified, 97 other patients had infections with GAS, and 151 had infections with GBS. The median age of the SDSE patients was 75 years; 51% were male and 79% had underlying diseases. Forty-two SDSE patients (19%) presented to the emergency department. Among the 150 patients (65%) for whom follow-up was completed, 19 (13%) died and eight (5%) had post-infective sequelae (poor outcome). Insufficient white blood cell responses (<5000 cells/μL) and thrombocytopenia on admission each suggested significantly higher risk of poor outcome (ORs 3.6 and 4.5, respectively). Of 229 isolates, 55 (24%) showed an stG6792 emm type, which was significantly associated with poor outcome (OR 2.4). Clinical manifestations of invasive SDSE infections were distinct from those of invasive GBS infections. Primary-care doctors should consider invasive SDSE infections when treating elderly patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1097-1103
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus pyogenes
Streptococcus
Japan
Infection
Thrombocytopenia
Hospital Emergency Service
Primary Health Care
Leukocytes

Keywords

  • Invasive infections
  • Non-invasive infections
  • Streptococcus agalactiae
  • Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis
  • Streptococcus pyogenes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clinical aspects of invasive infections with Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis in Japan : Differences with respect to Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae infections. / Takahashi, T.; Sunaoshi, K.; Sunakawa, K.; Fujishima, Seitaro; Watanabe, H.; Ubukata, K.

In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol. 16, No. 8, 2010, p. 1097-1103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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