Clinical differences between elderly-onset ulcerative colitis and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis: A nationwide survey data in Japan

Shunsuke Komoto, Masaaki Higashiyama, Chikako Watanabe, Yasuo Suzuki, Mamoru Watanabe, Toshifumi Hibi, Toru Takebayashi, Keiko Asakura, Yuji Nishiwaki, Soichiro Miura, Ryota Hokari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aim: Studies on the characteristics of elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (EOUC) and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (NEOUC) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of this study was to compare disease characteristics of EOUC and NEOUC by analyzing the database of the Japanese nationwide inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) registry. Methods: We analyzed the age of disease onset, sex, disease severity, and disease extent in patients with ulcerative colitis that were newly diagnosed and registered within 1 year between 2004 and 2009 (n = 28 179). We also analyzed the medical treatment, rate of IBD-related surgery, and postoperative complications. We compared them between younger than 65 years old (NEOUC group) and 65 years old or older (EOUC group) patients. Results: A total of 25 401 (90.1%) and 2778 (9.9%) patients were included in the NEOUC and EOUC groups, respectively. In the EOUC group, disease activity was significantly higher, and extent of pathological changes in the colon more extended significantly. Laboratory findings showed that inflammatory markers were elevated significantly in the EOUC group. The proportion of those with IBD-related hospitalization was significantly higher in the EOUC group (54.2% vs 35.7%, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients who were treated with corticosteroids was significantly higher in the EOUC group (36.7% vs 30.8%, P < 0.001). Significantly more number of patients underwent IBD-related surgery in the EOUC group (0.68% vs 0.27%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Elderly patients show higher disease activity, with a higher proportion requiring IBD-related hospitalization and IBD-related surgery, according to the nationwide registry in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Ulcerative Colitis
Japan
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Surveys and Questionnaires
Registries
Hospitalization
Age of Onset
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Colon
Databases

Keywords

  • Elderly-onset
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Clinical differences between elderly-onset ulcerative colitis and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis : A nationwide survey data in Japan. / Komoto, Shunsuke; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Watanabe, Chikako; Suzuki, Yasuo; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi; Takebayashi, Toru; Asakura, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Komoto, Shunsuke ; Higashiyama, Masaaki ; Watanabe, Chikako ; Suzuki, Yasuo ; Watanabe, Mamoru ; Hibi, Toshifumi ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Asakura, Keiko ; Nishiwaki, Yuji ; Miura, Soichiro ; Hokari, Ryota. / Clinical differences between elderly-onset ulcerative colitis and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis : A nationwide survey data in Japan. In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia). 2018.
@article{de5a5f0b4cac4a26954eedbb72eeede7,
title = "Clinical differences between elderly-onset ulcerative colitis and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis: A nationwide survey data in Japan",
abstract = "Background and Aim: Studies on the characteristics of elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (EOUC) and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (NEOUC) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of this study was to compare disease characteristics of EOUC and NEOUC by analyzing the database of the Japanese nationwide inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) registry. Methods: We analyzed the age of disease onset, sex, disease severity, and disease extent in patients with ulcerative colitis that were newly diagnosed and registered within 1 year between 2004 and 2009 (n = 28 179). We also analyzed the medical treatment, rate of IBD-related surgery, and postoperative complications. We compared them between younger than 65 years old (NEOUC group) and 65 years old or older (EOUC group) patients. Results: A total of 25 401 (90.1{\%}) and 2778 (9.9{\%}) patients were included in the NEOUC and EOUC groups, respectively. In the EOUC group, disease activity was significantly higher, and extent of pathological changes in the colon more extended significantly. Laboratory findings showed that inflammatory markers were elevated significantly in the EOUC group. The proportion of those with IBD-related hospitalization was significantly higher in the EOUC group (54.2{\%} vs 35.7{\%}, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients who were treated with corticosteroids was significantly higher in the EOUC group (36.7{\%} vs 30.8{\%}, P < 0.001). Significantly more number of patients underwent IBD-related surgery in the EOUC group (0.68{\%} vs 0.27{\%}, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Elderly patients show higher disease activity, with a higher proportion requiring IBD-related hospitalization and IBD-related surgery, according to the nationwide registry in Japan.",
keywords = "Elderly-onset, Inflammatory bowel disease, Ulcerative colitis",
author = "Shunsuke Komoto and Masaaki Higashiyama and Chikako Watanabe and Yasuo Suzuki and Mamoru Watanabe and Toshifumi Hibi and Toru Takebayashi and Keiko Asakura and Yuji Nishiwaki and Soichiro Miura and Ryota Hokari",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jgh.14263",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)",
issn = "0815-9319",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical differences between elderly-onset ulcerative colitis and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis

T2 - A nationwide survey data in Japan

AU - Komoto, Shunsuke

AU - Higashiyama, Masaaki

AU - Watanabe, Chikako

AU - Suzuki, Yasuo

AU - Watanabe, Mamoru

AU - Hibi, Toshifumi

AU - Takebayashi, Toru

AU - Asakura, Keiko

AU - Nishiwaki, Yuji

AU - Miura, Soichiro

AU - Hokari, Ryota

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background and Aim: Studies on the characteristics of elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (EOUC) and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (NEOUC) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of this study was to compare disease characteristics of EOUC and NEOUC by analyzing the database of the Japanese nationwide inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) registry. Methods: We analyzed the age of disease onset, sex, disease severity, and disease extent in patients with ulcerative colitis that were newly diagnosed and registered within 1 year between 2004 and 2009 (n = 28 179). We also analyzed the medical treatment, rate of IBD-related surgery, and postoperative complications. We compared them between younger than 65 years old (NEOUC group) and 65 years old or older (EOUC group) patients. Results: A total of 25 401 (90.1%) and 2778 (9.9%) patients were included in the NEOUC and EOUC groups, respectively. In the EOUC group, disease activity was significantly higher, and extent of pathological changes in the colon more extended significantly. Laboratory findings showed that inflammatory markers were elevated significantly in the EOUC group. The proportion of those with IBD-related hospitalization was significantly higher in the EOUC group (54.2% vs 35.7%, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients who were treated with corticosteroids was significantly higher in the EOUC group (36.7% vs 30.8%, P < 0.001). Significantly more number of patients underwent IBD-related surgery in the EOUC group (0.68% vs 0.27%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Elderly patients show higher disease activity, with a higher proportion requiring IBD-related hospitalization and IBD-related surgery, according to the nationwide registry in Japan.

AB - Background and Aim: Studies on the characteristics of elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (EOUC) and non-elderly-onset ulcerative colitis (NEOUC) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of this study was to compare disease characteristics of EOUC and NEOUC by analyzing the database of the Japanese nationwide inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) registry. Methods: We analyzed the age of disease onset, sex, disease severity, and disease extent in patients with ulcerative colitis that were newly diagnosed and registered within 1 year between 2004 and 2009 (n = 28 179). We also analyzed the medical treatment, rate of IBD-related surgery, and postoperative complications. We compared them between younger than 65 years old (NEOUC group) and 65 years old or older (EOUC group) patients. Results: A total of 25 401 (90.1%) and 2778 (9.9%) patients were included in the NEOUC and EOUC groups, respectively. In the EOUC group, disease activity was significantly higher, and extent of pathological changes in the colon more extended significantly. Laboratory findings showed that inflammatory markers were elevated significantly in the EOUC group. The proportion of those with IBD-related hospitalization was significantly higher in the EOUC group (54.2% vs 35.7%, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients who were treated with corticosteroids was significantly higher in the EOUC group (36.7% vs 30.8%, P < 0.001). Significantly more number of patients underwent IBD-related surgery in the EOUC group (0.68% vs 0.27%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Elderly patients show higher disease activity, with a higher proportion requiring IBD-related hospitalization and IBD-related surgery, according to the nationwide registry in Japan.

KW - Elderly-onset

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease

KW - Ulcerative colitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047613847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047613847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jgh.14263

DO - 10.1111/jgh.14263

M3 - Article

C2 - 29669163

AN - SCOPUS:85047613847

JO - Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)

JF - Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)

SN - 0815-9319

ER -