Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein

Shokei Matsumoto, Kazuhiko Sekine, Hiroyuki Funaoka, Tomohiro Funabiki, Taku Akashi, Kei Hayashida, Masayuki Shimizu, Tomohiko Orita, Motoyasu Yamazaki, Mitsuhide Kitano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shock bowel is one of the computed tomographic (CT) signs of hypotension, yet its clinical implications remain poorly understood. We evaluated how shock bowel affects clinical outcomes and the extent of intestinal epithelial damage in trauma patients by measuring the level of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). We reviewed the initial CT scans, taken in the emergency room, of 92 patients with severe blunt torso trauma who were consecutively admitted during a 24-month period. The data collected included CT signs of hypotension, I-FABP, feeding intolerance, and other clinical outcomes. Demographic and clinical outcomes were compared in patients with and without hemodynamic shock and shock bowel. Shock bowel was found in 16 patients (17.4%); of them 7 patients (43.8%) did not have hemodynamic shock. Certain CT signs of hypotension, namely free peritoneal fluid, contrast extravasation, small-caliber aorta, and shock bowel, were significantly more common in patients with hemodynamic shock than in patients without (P < 0.05). Injury severity score and the rate of consciousness disturbance were significantly higher in patients with shock bowel than in patients without (P < 0.05). The rate of feeding intolerance and median plasma I-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with shock bowel than in patients without (75.0% vs. 22.4%, P < 0.001 and 17.0 ng/mL vs. 3.7 ng/mL, P < 0.001, respectively). There was no difference in mortality. In conclusion, shock bowel is not always due to hemodynamic shock. It does, however, indicate severe intestinal mucosal damages and may predict feeding intolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalShock
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins
Shock
Hemodynamics
Hypotension
Torso
Injury Severity Score
Ascitic Fluid
Wounds and Injuries
Consciousness
Aorta
Hospital Emergency Service
Blood Proteins

Keywords

  • Blunt trauma
  • Computed tomography
  • Feeding intolerance
  • Hemodynamic shock
  • Intestinal fatty acid binding protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Matsumoto, S., Sekine, K., Funaoka, H., Funabiki, T., Akashi, T., Hayashida, K., ... Kitano, M. (2017). Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein. Shock, 47(1), 100-106. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000000733

Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein. / Matsumoto, Shokei; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Funaoka, Hiroyuki; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Akashi, Taku; Hayashida, Kei; Shimizu, Masayuki; Orita, Tomohiko; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Kitano, Mitsuhide.

In: Shock, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 100-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumoto, S, Sekine, K, Funaoka, H, Funabiki, T, Akashi, T, Hayashida, K, Shimizu, M, Orita, T, Yamazaki, M & Kitano, M 2017, 'Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein', Shock, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 100-106. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000000733
Matsumoto S, Sekine K, Funaoka H, Funabiki T, Akashi T, Hayashida K et al. Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein. Shock. 2017 Jan 1;47(1):100-106. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000000733
Matsumoto, Shokei ; Sekine, Kazuhiko ; Funaoka, Hiroyuki ; Funabiki, Tomohiro ; Akashi, Taku ; Hayashida, Kei ; Shimizu, Masayuki ; Orita, Tomohiko ; Yamazaki, Motoyasu ; Kitano, Mitsuhide. / Clinical evaluation of shock bowel using intestinal fatty acid binding protein. In: Shock. 2017 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 100-106.
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