Clinical usefulness of sputum culture on the first postoperative day to predict early postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

Kazuaki Matsui, Hirofumi Kawakubo, Satoru Matsuda, Shuhei Mayanagi, Tomoyuki Irino, Kazumasa Fukuda, Rieko Nakamura, Norihito Wada, Yuko Kitagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Postoperative pneumonia is a serious prognostic problem that can appear after esophagectomy in patients with esophageal cancer. The past reports have considered the usefulness of perioperative culture examinations for predicting postoperative pneumonia; however, the direct relationship between these examinations and postoperative complications remains unclear. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed esophageal cancer patients who underwent esophagectomy followed by sputum culture on the first postoperative day. The bacterial species that frequently cause hospital-acquired pneumonia were chosen as the target species in this study. The relationship between culture examination and postoperative pneumonia within one week (7 days) after esophagectomy was investigated. Results: Sputum cultures on the first postoperative day were investigated in 238 patients who underwent esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Forty-one patients developed pneumonia within one week after surgery. The target bacterial species were detected in 26 of 238 sputum cultures (10.9%). In the univariate analysis, a Brinkman index, detection of target bacterial species, detection of Gram-positive cocci, and Gram-negative rods were significantly associated with postoperative pneumonia. In the three independent multivariate analyses, the target bacterial species, Gram-positive cocci, and Gram-negative rods (p = 0.001, 0.042, and < 0.001) were individually identified as independent risk factors of postoperative pneumonia in addition to a Brinkman index. Conclusions: Detection of target bacterial species by sputum culture on the first postoperative day after esophagectomy was an independent risk factor of postoperative pneumonia within 7 days after surgery. Prospective studies for the prevention of early postoperative pneumonia using sputum culture on the first postoperative day can be considered.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEsophagus
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Esophageal cancer
  • Esophagectomy
  • Pneumonia
  • Postoperative pneumonia
  • Sputum culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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